The Dyslexia Subtyping Test (DST): Design and construct-related validation.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187301
Title:
The Dyslexia Subtyping Test (DST): Design and construct-related validation.
Author:
Roberts, Rhiannon.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Estimates indicate that students with learning disabilities (LD) represent 3-5% of the school population and that about 80% of these individuals evidence a reading disability or dyslexia. Because appropriate instruction depends upon correct classification, experts suggest that, if students are to be helped, research must shift to documenting specific subtypes within the classification of dyslexia. Historically, one of the most accepted theoretical models suggests the existence of three types of dyslexia. Under a variety of terms, the major subtypes, phonologic, orthographic, and mixed dyslexia, have been identified by practitioners throughout the years. Although many measures of phonologic processing are available currently, no widely-accepted measure of orthographic processing exists. The intent of the current study, therefore, was to create an instrument (Dyslexia Subtyping Test (DST)) that subtypes dyslexia into phonologic, orthographic, and phono/ortho or mixed dyslexia. Based upon suggestions found in recent research, the DST addresses dyslexia subtypes across two domains; receptive or decoding tasks and expressive or encoding tasks. Future revisions and directions for dyslexia subtyping are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bos, Candace

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Dyslexia Subtyping Test (DST): Design and construct-related validation.en_US
dc.creatorRoberts, Rhiannon.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Rhiannon.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEstimates indicate that students with learning disabilities (LD) represent 3-5% of the school population and that about 80% of these individuals evidence a reading disability or dyslexia. Because appropriate instruction depends upon correct classification, experts suggest that, if students are to be helped, research must shift to documenting specific subtypes within the classification of dyslexia. Historically, one of the most accepted theoretical models suggests the existence of three types of dyslexia. Under a variety of terms, the major subtypes, phonologic, orthographic, and mixed dyslexia, have been identified by practitioners throughout the years. Although many measures of phonologic processing are available currently, no widely-accepted measure of orthographic processing exists. The intent of the current study, therefore, was to create an instrument (Dyslexia Subtyping Test (DST)) that subtypes dyslexia into phonologic, orthographic, and phono/ortho or mixed dyslexia. Based upon suggestions found in recent research, the DST addresses dyslexia subtypes across two domains; receptive or decoding tasks and expressive or encoding tasks. Future revisions and directions for dyslexia subtyping are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBos, Candaceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSabers, Darrellen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMather, Nancyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9620363en_US
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