Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187288
Title:
Beginning call vocabulary learning: Translation in context.
Author:
Grace, Caroline Ann
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
As the role of software becomes increasingly central to the L2 curriculum, pedagogical models for L2 software are becoming increasingly needed. L2 classroom pedagogies are not necessarily directly applicable to CALL. CALL, for instance, does not assure learners that their guesses are correct as effectively as a teacher can. This limitation in CALL can be overcome by the L1. This study investigated the effect of the L1 in CALL on the receptive learning (short term [ST] and medium term [MT] retention) of French vocabulary. Subjects were 181 University of Arizona first and second semester French students randomly assigned to an experimental or a control group. Both groups attended identical user-controlled lessons comprised of a comic book story in French, an accompanying sound track (i.e., native voices and background audio), a rich color graphic environment supplementing the text, and "pregnant" (Mondria & Wit-de-boer, 1991) French definitional sentences. The experimental group had the option of accessing dialogue-level translations. MT retention was measured in a multiple-choice test two weeks after the lesson. Findings indicate that the addition of the L1 resulted in significantly superior ST (t = 9.38, p<.001) and MT retention (t = 6.98, p<.001); the experimental group scored 16.5 percent higher than the control group on the ST retention test, and 12.3 percent higher on the MT retention test. Though the control group spent more time getting L2 input than the experimental group (970 seconds vs. 773 seconds, respectively), it learned and retained significantly less than the experimental group and had a significantly slower response rate on the ST retention test. There was a positive relationship between time spent on the lesson and performance, suggesting that at least part of the effect of the experimental treatment is due to the additional time which it required subjects to spend on the lesson. Subject characteristics such as gender, learning style, and the number of years of high school French did not impact on ST and MT retention, while grade had an impact on performance: experimental students with a grade of A learned and retained the most.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Second Language Acquisition and Teaching; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ariew, Robert A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBeginning call vocabulary learning: Translation in context.en_US
dc.creatorGrace, Caroline Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrace, Caroline Annen_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs the role of software becomes increasingly central to the L2 curriculum, pedagogical models for L2 software are becoming increasingly needed. L2 classroom pedagogies are not necessarily directly applicable to CALL. CALL, for instance, does not assure learners that their guesses are correct as effectively as a teacher can. This limitation in CALL can be overcome by the L1. This study investigated the effect of the L1 in CALL on the receptive learning (short term [ST] and medium term [MT] retention) of French vocabulary. Subjects were 181 University of Arizona first and second semester French students randomly assigned to an experimental or a control group. Both groups attended identical user-controlled lessons comprised of a comic book story in French, an accompanying sound track (i.e., native voices and background audio), a rich color graphic environment supplementing the text, and "pregnant" (Mondria & Wit-de-boer, 1991) French definitional sentences. The experimental group had the option of accessing dialogue-level translations. MT retention was measured in a multiple-choice test two weeks after the lesson. Findings indicate that the addition of the L1 resulted in significantly superior ST (t = 9.38, p<.001) and MT retention (t = 6.98, p<.001); the experimental group scored 16.5 percent higher than the control group on the ST retention test, and 12.3 percent higher on the MT retention test. Though the control group spent more time getting L2 input than the experimental group (970 seconds vs. 773 seconds, respectively), it learned and retained significantly less than the experimental group and had a significantly slower response rate on the ST retention test. There was a positive relationship between time spent on the lesson and performance, suggesting that at least part of the effect of the experimental treatment is due to the additional time which it required subjects to spend on the lesson. Subject characteristics such as gender, learning style, and the number of years of high school French did not impact on ST and MT retention, while grade had an impact on performance: experimental students with a grade of A learned and retained the most.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition and Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAriew, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchulz, Renate A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWildner-Bassett, Mary E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9604514en_US
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