Factors influencing women's recovery from substance abuse: A grounded theory approach.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187254
Title:
Factors influencing women's recovery from substance abuse: A grounded theory approach.
Author:
Brooks, Audrey Jessica.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study of female substance use has traditionally been neglected. Yet female substance abusers differ from their male counterparts in the areas of economic resources, vulnerability to impaired family relations, abuse and victimization, social isolation, shame and stigma when entering treatment, and treatment resources to meet their needs as women and mothers. Despite this, females do as well, or better, than males in treatment, However, the number who actually complete treatment is still very low. A grounded theory approach was used to identify conditions influencing treatment retention and to develop a model of women's recovery from substance use. Miller's mutual empowerment model was used to generate preliminary hypotheses. Miller's model states that women's psychological development occurs in the context of their relationships and connection to others. It was hypothesized that the relationship with the treatment provider would be the critical variable influencing treatment retention. It was further hypothesized that supportive, empowering relationships are a crucial aspect of recovery, as well as the emergence of a new identity. These hypotheses were supported. A model, recovery through connections, was developed. A woman's recovery is dependent upon the connections she forms with treatment and herself. The importance of these connections is derived from the woman's need to fill a void, or state of deficit. The recovery process consists of two stages: connection with treatment and connection with self. Connection with treatment represents a positive connection with treatment. This connection is facilitated or hindered by positive and negative treatment characteristics. Positive treatment characteristics facilitate the formation of supportive relationships and lead to treatment completion. Negative treatment characteristics impede their formation and lead to quitting treatment. In the connection with self stage the woman is learning to meet her own needs and access power within herself. Personal qualities facilitating this connection are will, resourcefulness, spirituality and trusting others. Qualities hindering this connection are shame and self-doubt. Two contextual factors influencing the model are external forces and mothering. The final outcome is transformation. In transforming her life the woman transfers her connections from a using lifestyle and culture to a non-using, prosocial lifestyle.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Family and Consumer Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gamble, Wendy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFactors influencing women's recovery from substance abuse: A grounded theory approach.en_US
dc.creatorBrooks, Audrey Jessica.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Audrey Jessica.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study of female substance use has traditionally been neglected. Yet female substance abusers differ from their male counterparts in the areas of economic resources, vulnerability to impaired family relations, abuse and victimization, social isolation, shame and stigma when entering treatment, and treatment resources to meet their needs as women and mothers. Despite this, females do as well, or better, than males in treatment, However, the number who actually complete treatment is still very low. A grounded theory approach was used to identify conditions influencing treatment retention and to develop a model of women's recovery from substance use. Miller's mutual empowerment model was used to generate preliminary hypotheses. Miller's model states that women's psychological development occurs in the context of their relationships and connection to others. It was hypothesized that the relationship with the treatment provider would be the critical variable influencing treatment retention. It was further hypothesized that supportive, empowering relationships are a crucial aspect of recovery, as well as the emergence of a new identity. These hypotheses were supported. A model, recovery through connections, was developed. A woman's recovery is dependent upon the connections she forms with treatment and herself. The importance of these connections is derived from the woman's need to fill a void, or state of deficit. The recovery process consists of two stages: connection with treatment and connection with self. Connection with treatment represents a positive connection with treatment. This connection is facilitated or hindered by positive and negative treatment characteristics. Positive treatment characteristics facilitate the formation of supportive relationships and lead to treatment completion. Negative treatment characteristics impede their formation and lead to quitting treatment. In the connection with self stage the woman is learning to meet her own needs and access power within herself. Personal qualities facilitating this connection are will, resourcefulness, spirituality and trusting others. Qualities hindering this connection are shame and self-doubt. Two contextual factors influencing the model are external forces and mothering. The final outcome is transformation. In transforming her life the woman transfers her connections from a using lifestyle and culture to a non-using, prosocial lifestyle.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGamble, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristensen, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilhelm, Marien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScott, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPhillips, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9603704en_US
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