Edward P. Dozier: A history of Native-American discourse in anthropology.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187248
Title:
Edward P. Dozier: A history of Native-American discourse in anthropology.
Author:
Norcini, Marilyn Jane.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The contribution of Native Americans to the production of anthropological knowledge has received minimal critical analysis in the history of the discipline. This paper examines the academic career of Edward P. Dozier, the first Native American academic anthropologist, and founder/first chairman of the American Indian Studies Program at the University of Arizona. The changing insider and outsider positions of an indigenous anthropologist are explored historically through the diverse discursive practices in Pueblo and Euroamerican cultures. Edward P. Dozier (1916-71) was born in Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. His primary contributions were in Southwestern Pueblo ethnology and linguistics, specifically acculturation and ethnohistorical studies. For his dissertation research in 1949-50, he studied the changing social and ceremonial traditions of the Arizona Tewa (Hopi-Tewa) at Tewa Village (Hano) on First Mesa, Hopi Reservation. In 1958-59, Dozier conducted fieldwork with the Kalinga of northern Luzon in the Philippines for comparative purposes. This study is organized to reveal correlations between Dozier's indigenous anthropological discourse and Pueblo discursive practices. Chapter 1 discusses Dozier's formative identity as an Anglo and a Tewa within the context of his parent's relationships to language and culture. Chapter 2 describes Boasian anthropology with its emphasis on collecting native language texts and its influence on Dozier's graduate education and early publications. Chapter 3 compares Dozier's discourse with Pueblo systems of knowledge and Pueblo discursive patterns. Chapter 4 describes Dozier's dissertation fieldwork with the Arizona Tewas as a graduate student at the University of California at Los Angeles. Chapter 5 contrasts Dozier's non-indigenous research with the Kalinga of Northern Luzon, Philippines. Chapter 6 examines the economics of Native American research and Dozier's leadership role in establishing the American Indian Studies program at the University of Arizona. The concluding chapter positions Dozier as an indigenous anthropologist in the history of the discipline. Overall, the historical predicament of a Native American academic anthropologist contests the oversimplified dichotomy of Self and Other in the academic construct of "culture."
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Basso, Ellen B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEdward P. Dozier: A history of Native-American discourse in anthropology.en_US
dc.creatorNorcini, Marilyn Jane.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNorcini, Marilyn Jane.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe contribution of Native Americans to the production of anthropological knowledge has received minimal critical analysis in the history of the discipline. This paper examines the academic career of Edward P. Dozier, the first Native American academic anthropologist, and founder/first chairman of the American Indian Studies Program at the University of Arizona. The changing insider and outsider positions of an indigenous anthropologist are explored historically through the diverse discursive practices in Pueblo and Euroamerican cultures. Edward P. Dozier (1916-71) was born in Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. His primary contributions were in Southwestern Pueblo ethnology and linguistics, specifically acculturation and ethnohistorical studies. For his dissertation research in 1949-50, he studied the changing social and ceremonial traditions of the Arizona Tewa (Hopi-Tewa) at Tewa Village (Hano) on First Mesa, Hopi Reservation. In 1958-59, Dozier conducted fieldwork with the Kalinga of northern Luzon in the Philippines for comparative purposes. This study is organized to reveal correlations between Dozier's indigenous anthropological discourse and Pueblo discursive practices. Chapter 1 discusses Dozier's formative identity as an Anglo and a Tewa within the context of his parent's relationships to language and culture. Chapter 2 describes Boasian anthropology with its emphasis on collecting native language texts and its influence on Dozier's graduate education and early publications. Chapter 3 compares Dozier's discourse with Pueblo systems of knowledge and Pueblo discursive patterns. Chapter 4 describes Dozier's dissertation fieldwork with the Arizona Tewas as a graduate student at the University of California at Los Angeles. Chapter 5 contrasts Dozier's non-indigenous research with the Kalinga of Northern Luzon, Philippines. Chapter 6 examines the economics of Native American research and Dozier's leadership role in establishing the American Indian Studies program at the University of Arizona. The concluding chapter positions Dozier as an indigenous anthropologist in the history of the discipline. Overall, the historical predicament of a Native American academic anthropologist contests the oversimplified dichotomy of Self and Other in the academic construct of "culture."en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBasso, Ellen B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHenderson, Richard N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFord, Richard I.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9603698en_US
dc.identifier.oclc706146116en_US
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