Analysis of the implementation of noxious weed policy on Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service lands in Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187237
Title:
Analysis of the implementation of noxious weed policy on Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service lands in Arizona.
Author:
Cramer, Gary Clark.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Noxious weeds are harmful plants that are regulated by law. It is their regulation that makes them unique from other weeds. At least 14 noxious weed species are known to occur in Arizona. The Federal Noxious Weed Act of 1974, as amended in 1990, directs all federal agencies to develop, coordinate, fund, and implement noxious weed programs on land that they manage. This dissertation describes and evaluates the implementation of federal noxious weed policy by the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management in Arizona. Policy design methodology is used to construct a model of federal policy. Policy elements evaluated include statutes, implementing agents, target audiences, and the policy rules and tools that link these players to policy outcomes. Interviews with agents and targets revealed that there are no noxious weed programs being conducted on Forest Service or BLM lands in Arizona. Also, there is an insignificant amount of funding being provided for such programs. Policy design methods are used to assess the context of the implementation problem. Policy tools are recommended to address the lack of knowledge about infestation levels and management options. Additional support building tools are recommended to address the adaption of integrated weed management techniques.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gregg, R. Frank

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of the implementation of noxious weed policy on Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service lands in Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorCramer, Gary Clark.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCramer, Gary Clark.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNoxious weeds are harmful plants that are regulated by law. It is their regulation that makes them unique from other weeds. At least 14 noxious weed species are known to occur in Arizona. The Federal Noxious Weed Act of 1974, as amended in 1990, directs all federal agencies to develop, coordinate, fund, and implement noxious weed programs on land that they manage. This dissertation describes and evaluates the implementation of federal noxious weed policy by the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management in Arizona. Policy design methodology is used to construct a model of federal policy. Policy elements evaluated include statutes, implementing agents, target audiences, and the policy rules and tools that link these players to policy outcomes. Interviews with agents and targets revealed that there are no noxious weed programs being conducted on Forest Service or BLM lands in Arizona. Also, there is an insignificant amount of funding being provided for such programs. Policy design methods are used to assess the context of the implementation problem. Policy tools are recommended to address the lack of knowledge about infestation levels and management options. Additional support building tools are recommended to address the adaption of integrated weed management techniques.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGregg, R. Franken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOgden, Phil R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCortner, Hanna J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, D. Phillipen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9603383en_US
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