Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187226
Title:
An archaeological commentary on the Josianic reforms.
Author:
Manor, Dale Wallace.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the earlier part of this century, archaeology was imported into biblical studies as a tool to demonstrate the historical accuracy of the Bible. Methodological differences, however, prevented very meaningful dialogue and eventually the two disciplines drifted apart. Archaeology has matured in the intervening years and now can enter a dialogue with biblical studies as an independent discipline. While biblical studies and archaeology work with different sets of data and approach the same subject with different questions, the disciplines can meaningfully intersect when they are interpreted through the perspective of anthropology of religion. Anthropology, with its study of the nature of religion and ritual, provides a matrix into which archaeology and biblical studies can place their respective data and find an interpretive framework. This dissertation uses Josiah's reforms (2 Kings 23) as a test case to bring archaeology and biblical studies into dialogue. The text lists activities and artifacts that were objects of Josiah's reform. The first three chapters deal with biblical and general anthropological data. Chapters four and five focus specifically on bamot and goddess worship. Chapter six discusses an array of artifacts: worship of the heavenly bodies, cult functionaries, child sacrifice, standing stones, the occult, and figurines. Each section examines the biblical data, anthropological theory, and any artifactual evidence that might reflect cultic practices. The purpose has been not to offer a comprehensive or exhaustive list of artifacts, but to show the types of objects that attracted Josiah's attention.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Jews -- History -- To 586 B.C.; Judaism -- History -- To 70 A.D.; Excavations (Archaeology) -- Palestine.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Near Eastern Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Dever, William G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn archaeological commentary on the Josianic reforms.en_US
dc.creatorManor, Dale Wallace.en_US
dc.contributor.authorManor, Dale Wallace.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the earlier part of this century, archaeology was imported into biblical studies as a tool to demonstrate the historical accuracy of the Bible. Methodological differences, however, prevented very meaningful dialogue and eventually the two disciplines drifted apart. Archaeology has matured in the intervening years and now can enter a dialogue with biblical studies as an independent discipline. While biblical studies and archaeology work with different sets of data and approach the same subject with different questions, the disciplines can meaningfully intersect when they are interpreted through the perspective of anthropology of religion. Anthropology, with its study of the nature of religion and ritual, provides a matrix into which archaeology and biblical studies can place their respective data and find an interpretive framework. This dissertation uses Josiah's reforms (2 Kings 23) as a test case to bring archaeology and biblical studies into dialogue. The text lists activities and artifacts that were objects of Josiah's reform. The first three chapters deal with biblical and general anthropological data. Chapters four and five focus specifically on bamot and goddess worship. Chapter six discusses an array of artifacts: worship of the heavenly bodies, cult functionaries, child sacrifice, standing stones, the occult, and figurines. Each section examines the biblical data, anthropological theory, and any artifactual evidence that might reflect cultic practices. The purpose has been not to offer a comprehensive or exhaustive list of artifacts, but to show the types of objects that attracted Josiah's attention.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectJews -- History -- To 586 B.C.en_US
dc.subjectJudaism -- History -- To 70 A.D.en_US
dc.subjectExcavations (Archaeology) -- Palestine.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDever, William G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWright, J. Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeonard, Alberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9603373en_US
dc.identifier.oclc706137862en_US
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