Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187222
Title:
Archaeology as archaeology.
Author:
Jones, Timothy William
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The objective of this dissertation is to investigate the difference between behavior as it is reported and actual behavior as determined through material behavioral remains (garbage). The goal was to then use this knowledge to provide insight into what archaeologists were viewing in their data in relation to meaning, perception and behavior. Four studies were conducted. The first study looked at caries prevalence in relation to numerous variables (fluoride, milk consumption, sugar consumption, brushing rates, antibiotic use, school fluoride programs, and school lunch programs) most of which were measured through materials means in order to determine if different conclusions would be reached in comparison to traditional findings based on reported behavior. The second and third studies looked at reported versus actual use in relation to a number of sociometric and lifestyle/attitude variables. The fourth study compared different kinds of reported behavior to actual behavior in conjunction with aspects of the meaning system (values and attitudes). The findings of these studies generally indicate that (1) everyday mundane behavior is guided by a realm that is not accessible and (2) behaviors that are cognized are guided by a realm that is accessible and is the reality we perceive. The implications for archaeology include (1) meaning is not well reflected in everyday mundane behavior (the bulk of behavior archaeologists study) and (2) behaviors where meaning guides actual behavior are those behaviors that culture stresses as important to cognize.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Rathje, William L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleArchaeology as archaeology.en_US
dc.creatorJones, Timothy Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Timothy Williamen_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this dissertation is to investigate the difference between behavior as it is reported and actual behavior as determined through material behavioral remains (garbage). The goal was to then use this knowledge to provide insight into what archaeologists were viewing in their data in relation to meaning, perception and behavior. Four studies were conducted. The first study looked at caries prevalence in relation to numerous variables (fluoride, milk consumption, sugar consumption, brushing rates, antibiotic use, school fluoride programs, and school lunch programs) most of which were measured through materials means in order to determine if different conclusions would be reached in comparison to traditional findings based on reported behavior. The second and third studies looked at reported versus actual use in relation to a number of sociometric and lifestyle/attitude variables. The fourth study compared different kinds of reported behavior to actual behavior in conjunction with aspects of the meaning system (values and attitudes). The findings of these studies generally indicate that (1) everyday mundane behavior is guided by a realm that is not accessible and (2) behaviors that are cognized are guided by a realm that is accessible and is the reality we perceive. The implications for archaeology include (1) meaning is not well reflected in everyday mundane behavior (the bulk of behavior archaeologists study) and (2) behaviors where meaning guides actual behavior are those behaviors that culture stresses as important to cognize.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRathje, William L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchiffer, Michael B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArkowitz, Harold S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9603370en_US
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