Re-engineering the classroom: A field study of computer-supported collaborative learning.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187209
Title:
Re-engineering the classroom: A field study of computer-supported collaborative learning.
Author:
Brandt, Sheila Ann.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Cognitive learning theory predicts, and studies have demonstrated that immediate and frequent feedback, cooperative learning, and reduced evaluation apprehension can improve learning. Electronic meeting systems (EMS) offer new support for these concepts, and may lead to an improved learning environment. In an attempt to create and evaluate a more effective, active, problem-solving learning environment, the following research questions were identified: (1) Does EMS classroom use affect learning? (2) How is EMS used in the classroom over time? A field study of computer-supported collaborative learning was conducted to answer these questions. Ten junior English classes at one high school were the volunteer subjects for this year-long study. One class received the treatment (classroom use of an EMS) and the other nine classes served as control groups. Each student in each class was given a pre-treatment writing assignment and survey and a post-treatment writing assignment and survey to assess writing skill development and perceived writing product and process skill development. Quantitative difference scores (post-pre) for the writing assignment and the survey were tabulated and the class means were analyzed using an Analysis of Variance. In addition, the treatment group served as "the case" in the case study portion of this study and was consistently observed throughout the school year. To determine patterns of classroom activities and interactions, field notes and formal interview transcripts were coded using a coding scheme developed specifically for this study. Findings of this study provide strong evidence that EMS technology had a positive effect in the classroom. A cooperative learning environment emerged where students consistently worked together and were task-focused. Students tackled more and bigger problems than permitted by the traditional classroom. Furthermore, the EMS technology provided more opportunities for immediate and frequent feedback. Finally, the EMS class developed stronger writing skills as compared to the other classes that did not employ EMS technology in the classroom. Thus, the results of this study suggest that the incorporation of EMS technology in the classroom fosters a more effective learning environment.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Nunamaker, Jay F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRe-engineering the classroom: A field study of computer-supported collaborative learning.en_US
dc.creatorBrandt, Sheila Ann.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrandt, Sheila Ann.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCognitive learning theory predicts, and studies have demonstrated that immediate and frequent feedback, cooperative learning, and reduced evaluation apprehension can improve learning. Electronic meeting systems (EMS) offer new support for these concepts, and may lead to an improved learning environment. In an attempt to create and evaluate a more effective, active, problem-solving learning environment, the following research questions were identified: (1) Does EMS classroom use affect learning? (2) How is EMS used in the classroom over time? A field study of computer-supported collaborative learning was conducted to answer these questions. Ten junior English classes at one high school were the volunteer subjects for this year-long study. One class received the treatment (classroom use of an EMS) and the other nine classes served as control groups. Each student in each class was given a pre-treatment writing assignment and survey and a post-treatment writing assignment and survey to assess writing skill development and perceived writing product and process skill development. Quantitative difference scores (post-pre) for the writing assignment and the survey were tabulated and the class means were analyzed using an Analysis of Variance. In addition, the treatment group served as "the case" in the case study portion of this study and was consistently observed throughout the school year. To determine patterns of classroom activities and interactions, field notes and formal interview transcripts were coded using a coding scheme developed specifically for this study. Findings of this study provide strong evidence that EMS technology had a positive effect in the classroom. A cooperative learning environment emerged where students consistently worked together and were task-focused. Students tackled more and bigger problems than permitted by the traditional classroom. Furthermore, the EMS technology provided more opportunities for immediate and frequent feedback. Finally, the EMS class developed stronger writing skills as compared to the other classes that did not employ EMS technology in the classroom. Thus, the results of this study suggest that the incorporation of EMS technology in the classroom fosters a more effective learning environment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairNunamaker, Jay F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVogel, Douglas R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, Robert O.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9603356en_US
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