PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF THE COLOSTRAL PEPTIDE, COLOSTROKININ, AND INANITION ON IMMUNOGLOBULIN ABSORPTION AND ADRENAL/THYROID RESPONSE IN THE BOVINE NEONATE.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187192
Title:
PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF THE COLOSTRAL PEPTIDE, COLOSTROKININ, AND INANITION ON IMMUNOGLOBULIN ABSORPTION AND ADRENAL/THYROID RESPONSE IN THE BOVINE NEONATE.
Author:
SCHLAGHECK, THOMAS GERARD.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Sixty-two newborn Holstein-Friesian calves were used to study the role of colostrokinin, serum cortisol, and serum thyroxine in the absorption of maternal immunoglobulin. Calves were removed from their dams prior to suckling and assigned one of four rations: colostrum, whole milk, milk plus colostral immunoglobulin, and milk plus immunoglobulin plus colostrokinin. Calves were fed their assigned ration either at birth or after twelve hours inanition. All calves were fed pooled colostrum at 24 hours postpartum. Blood samples were collected at seventeen times during the first 32 hours postpartum. Calves were born with high cortisol concentrations (88 ng/ml) which decreased (P < .05) within two hours postfeeding. Serum cortisol levels increased (P < .05) between two and three hours after calves ingested a colostral source of immunoglobulin. Time of initial feeding had no effect on the cortisol surge. No such increase was observed in neonates consuming an immunoglobulin-free milk ration. These results demonstrate that the immunoglobulin fraction of colostrum is responsible for initiating an increase in cortisol secretion by the adrenal cortex. Within four hours postpartum, serum thyroxine concentrations increased (P < .05) at least 50% in all treatment groups regardless of whether the calves were fed or fasted. After peaking at 18 μg/dL, the serum thyroxine concentrations fell gradually throughout the duration of the collection period. Colostrokinin exhibited a biphasic effect on serum immunoglobulin concentrations which was dependent on the initial time of feeding. Calves exposed to colostrokinin in 0 hour feedings had serum immunoglobulin G concentrations significantly higher (P < .05) after 16 hours postpartum than animals not fed colostrokinin. Fasted calves, exposed to colostrokinin at 12 hours postpartum, had no increase in serum immunoglobulin G concentrations following a colostrum feeding at 24 hours postpartum. Fasted calves fed a ration not containing colostrokinin exhibited a two-fold increase in serum immunoglobulin G concentrations after the 24 hour colostrum feeding. Colostrokinin did not have an immediate effect on serum immunoglobulin G concentrations, but required an approximate twelve hour period to manifest its regulatory function. The presence or absence of colostrokinin in the experimental rations did not have any effect on the cortisol or thyroxine profiles. The variable serum immunoglobulin G profiles suggest that colostrokinin is involved in the acquisition of passive immunity by the calf, but colostrokinin may have more than one physiological role.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Calves -- Feeding and feeds.; Colostrum.; Hydrocortisone -- Physiological effect.; Immunoglobulins.; Peptides -- Physiological effect.; Thyroxine -- Physiological effect.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Animal Physiology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF THE COLOSTRAL PEPTIDE, COLOSTROKININ, AND INANITION ON IMMUNOGLOBULIN ABSORPTION AND ADRENAL/THYROID RESPONSE IN THE BOVINE NEONATE.en_US
dc.creatorSCHLAGHECK, THOMAS GERARD.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSCHLAGHECK, THOMAS GERARD.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSixty-two newborn Holstein-Friesian calves were used to study the role of colostrokinin, serum cortisol, and serum thyroxine in the absorption of maternal immunoglobulin. Calves were removed from their dams prior to suckling and assigned one of four rations: colostrum, whole milk, milk plus colostral immunoglobulin, and milk plus immunoglobulin plus colostrokinin. Calves were fed their assigned ration either at birth or after twelve hours inanition. All calves were fed pooled colostrum at 24 hours postpartum. Blood samples were collected at seventeen times during the first 32 hours postpartum. Calves were born with high cortisol concentrations (88 ng/ml) which decreased (P < .05) within two hours postfeeding. Serum cortisol levels increased (P < .05) between two and three hours after calves ingested a colostral source of immunoglobulin. Time of initial feeding had no effect on the cortisol surge. No such increase was observed in neonates consuming an immunoglobulin-free milk ration. These results demonstrate that the immunoglobulin fraction of colostrum is responsible for initiating an increase in cortisol secretion by the adrenal cortex. Within four hours postpartum, serum thyroxine concentrations increased (P < .05) at least 50% in all treatment groups regardless of whether the calves were fed or fasted. After peaking at 18 μg/dL, the serum thyroxine concentrations fell gradually throughout the duration of the collection period. Colostrokinin exhibited a biphasic effect on serum immunoglobulin concentrations which was dependent on the initial time of feeding. Calves exposed to colostrokinin in 0 hour feedings had serum immunoglobulin G concentrations significantly higher (P < .05) after 16 hours postpartum than animals not fed colostrokinin. Fasted calves, exposed to colostrokinin at 12 hours postpartum, had no increase in serum immunoglobulin G concentrations following a colostrum feeding at 24 hours postpartum. Fasted calves fed a ration not containing colostrokinin exhibited a two-fold increase in serum immunoglobulin G concentrations after the 24 hour colostrum feeding. Colostrokinin did not have an immediate effect on serum immunoglobulin G concentrations, but required an approximate twelve hour period to manifest its regulatory function. The presence or absence of colostrokinin in the experimental rations did not have any effect on the cortisol or thyroxine profiles. The variable serum immunoglobulin G profiles suggest that colostrokinin is involved in the acquisition of passive immunity by the calf, but colostrokinin may have more than one physiological role.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCalves -- Feeding and feeds.en_US
dc.subjectColostrum.en_US
dc.subjectHydrocortisone -- Physiological effect.en_US
dc.subjectImmunoglobulins.en_US
dc.subjectPeptides -- Physiological effect.en_US
dc.subjectThyroxine -- Physiological effect.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal Physiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChiasson, R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKoldovsky, O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCalder, W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVleck, D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8324459en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690157050en_US
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