Domesticating universal brotherhood: Feminine values and the construction of utopia, Point Loma Homestead, 1897-1920.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187175
Title:
Domesticating universal brotherhood: Feminine values and the construction of utopia, Point Loma Homestead, 1897-1920.
Author:
Waterstone, Penny Brown.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Point Loma Universal Brotherhood and Theosophical Society Homestead, a utopian experiment established near San Diego, California, in 1897, created a distinctly feminine version of the "perfect community" by drawing on aspects of Theosophy that emphasized values that during the 19th century were closely identified with women--selflessness, connectedness, morality, and purity of body and mind, while deemphasizing those generally associated with male character--intellectualism, rationality, individualism, and aggression. Bolstered by the almost limitless authority of the community's founder, Katherine Tingley, the women of Point Loma Colony embraced an ideology of woman's morally superior nature, and used that ideology to expand woman's "natural" sphere of influence. Point Loma's emphasis on selfless service to others required a material base that freed women from the demands of narrow, isolated family units by providing communal childcare and kitchens, economic security, and access to education regardless of gender. This limited feminine commonwealth created a space for improvisation in which brotherhood was equated with sisterhood, fictive family bonds replaced blood ties, and childless mothers took the place of real ones.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Point Loma (Calif.); Theosophy -- California -- Point Loma -- History.; Utopias -- California.; Women's studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
History; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Anderson, Karen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDomesticating universal brotherhood: Feminine values and the construction of utopia, Point Loma Homestead, 1897-1920.en_US
dc.creatorWaterstone, Penny Brown.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWaterstone, Penny Brown.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Point Loma Universal Brotherhood and Theosophical Society Homestead, a utopian experiment established near San Diego, California, in 1897, created a distinctly feminine version of the "perfect community" by drawing on aspects of Theosophy that emphasized values that during the 19th century were closely identified with women--selflessness, connectedness, morality, and purity of body and mind, while deemphasizing those generally associated with male character--intellectualism, rationality, individualism, and aggression. Bolstered by the almost limitless authority of the community's founder, Katherine Tingley, the women of Point Loma Colony embraced an ideology of woman's morally superior nature, and used that ideology to expand woman's "natural" sphere of influence. Point Loma's emphasis on selfless service to others required a material base that freed women from the demands of narrow, isolated family units by providing communal childcare and kitchens, economic security, and access to education regardless of gender. This limited feminine commonwealth created a space for improvisation in which brotherhood was equated with sisterhood, fictive family bonds replaced blood ties, and childless mothers took the place of real ones.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPoint Loma (Calif.)en_US
dc.subjectTheosophy -- California -- Point Loma -- History.en_US
dc.subjectUtopias -- California.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAnderson, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFitzgerald, Maureenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Patricken_US
dc.identifier.proquest9534681en_US
dc.identifier.oclc705929278en_US
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