Structure and properties of laser-fired, sol-gel derived tungsten oxide films.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187173
Title:
Structure and properties of laser-fired, sol-gel derived tungsten oxide films.
Author:
Taylor, Douglas John.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This investigation focuses on the use of laser radiation to fire sol-gel derived oxide films. The main emphasis of this work was to make high quality tungsten oxide films with good electrochromic properties. Laser firing was done with a carbon dioxide laser operated in continuous mode. The laser-fired tungsten oxide films were measured for density, composition, crystallinity and electrochromic behavior. Analytical tools included multi-angle ellipsometry, FTIR, TEM, XRD, spectrophotometry and electrochemistry. The effect of process variables (laser power, spot size and translation speed) on the extent of film densification and microstructural evolution was investigated. Thermal modeling of laser-heated sol-gel films was studied to further understand the laser firing process and to estimate firing temperatures. Temperature calculations were based on laser parameters, sample geometry and target materials. Properties characteristic of firing temperature were used to verify the thermal modeling. For laser-fired films, the properties at the calculated temperatures agreed well with the properties of similar furnace-fired films. The modeling also provided the thermal profiles seen by the laser heated materials. Laser firing was shown to be a feasible technique to make good quality electrochromic films. By precisely controlling the irradiation, the microstructure of tungsten oxide films was tailored to produce the desired electrochromic properties. Transmission electron microscopy showed film microstructures that varied from completely amorphous to fully crystalline. Corresponding optoelectrochemical measurements indicated a decrease in electrochromism with increasing crystallinity. The effects of density/porosity and coating composition are also discussed. It is proposed that laser firing of sol-gel derived films can be used for optics, sensors, graded index materials, and electrochromic windows. The ability to heat localized regions afforded by laser firing is advantageous for writing lines and patterns in these films. Windows with graded electrochromic properties can be made by dynamically changing the laser firing conditions as the beam rasters through a workpiece. Similarly, electrochromic signs can be written into a window--after the pattern is written by laser densification, the remaining film is etched away, leaving the pattern.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Materials Science and Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Birnie, Dunbar P. III

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleStructure and properties of laser-fired, sol-gel derived tungsten oxide films.en_US
dc.creatorTaylor, Douglas John.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Douglas John.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis investigation focuses on the use of laser radiation to fire sol-gel derived oxide films. The main emphasis of this work was to make high quality tungsten oxide films with good electrochromic properties. Laser firing was done with a carbon dioxide laser operated in continuous mode. The laser-fired tungsten oxide films were measured for density, composition, crystallinity and electrochromic behavior. Analytical tools included multi-angle ellipsometry, FTIR, TEM, XRD, spectrophotometry and electrochemistry. The effect of process variables (laser power, spot size and translation speed) on the extent of film densification and microstructural evolution was investigated. Thermal modeling of laser-heated sol-gel films was studied to further understand the laser firing process and to estimate firing temperatures. Temperature calculations were based on laser parameters, sample geometry and target materials. Properties characteristic of firing temperature were used to verify the thermal modeling. For laser-fired films, the properties at the calculated temperatures agreed well with the properties of similar furnace-fired films. The modeling also provided the thermal profiles seen by the laser heated materials. Laser firing was shown to be a feasible technique to make good quality electrochromic films. By precisely controlling the irradiation, the microstructure of tungsten oxide films was tailored to produce the desired electrochromic properties. Transmission electron microscopy showed film microstructures that varied from completely amorphous to fully crystalline. Corresponding optoelectrochemical measurements indicated a decrease in electrochromism with increasing crystallinity. The effects of density/porosity and coating composition are also discussed. It is proposed that laser firing of sol-gel derived films can be used for optics, sensors, graded index materials, and electrochromic windows. The ability to heat localized regions afforded by laser firing is advantageous for writing lines and patterns in these films. Windows with graded electrochromic properties can be made by dynamically changing the laser firing conditions as the beam rasters through a workpiece. Similarly, electrochromic signs can be written into a window--after the pattern is written by laser densification, the remaining film is etched away, leaving the pattern.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBirnie, Dunbar P. IIIen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFabes, Brian D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUhlmann, Donald R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAllard, Larry F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9534679en_US
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