Etiological risk factors in juvenile delinquency: A comparison of Swiss and American adolescents.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187154
Title:
Etiological risk factors in juvenile delinquency: A comparison of Swiss and American adolescents.
Author:
Vázsonyi, Alexander Thomas.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examined etiological risk factors in juvenile delinquency from a control theory perspective (social and self-control theories). Two adolescent samples were used for this purpose: A Swiss national sample (N = 970) and a local American sample (N = 232). Four main questions were empirically examined: First, whether rates of deviance in delinquency were different by Swiss educational tracks (apprentices versus Gymnasium students) and by national origin (Swiss versus "non-Swiss"). Second, whether underlying developmental processes in juvenile delinquency were similar by educational tracks, by language regions, and by birth origins. Third, whether self-control was predictive of later deviance (U.S. sample). And finally, what explanation applied to the rates of delinquency in Swiss and American youth. The findings were: (1) Apprentices were more delinquent than Gymnasium students; no difference was found by national origin; (2) self-control during early adolescence was highly predictive of delinquent behavior four years later; and (3) American youths were consistently more delinquent than their Swiss age mates, especially on more serious acts. Although developmental processes in delinquency were similar for both groups, Swiss youth reported closer family relations and a higher level of self-control. These closer family relations and the greater self-control accounted for over 70 percent of the mean level difference in delinquency by nation. The discussion section focuses on implications of this study's findings for the tenets of self-control theory as well as its implications for national differences.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Juvenile delinquency -- Switzerland.; Juvenile delinquency -- United States.; Juvenile delinquents -- Switzerland.; Juvenile delinquents -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Family and Consumer Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Rowe, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEtiological risk factors in juvenile delinquency: A comparison of Swiss and American adolescents.en_US
dc.creatorVázsonyi, Alexander Thomas.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVázsonyi, Alexander Thomas.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examined etiological risk factors in juvenile delinquency from a control theory perspective (social and self-control theories). Two adolescent samples were used for this purpose: A Swiss national sample (N = 970) and a local American sample (N = 232). Four main questions were empirically examined: First, whether rates of deviance in delinquency were different by Swiss educational tracks (apprentices versus Gymnasium students) and by national origin (Swiss versus "non-Swiss"). Second, whether underlying developmental processes in juvenile delinquency were similar by educational tracks, by language regions, and by birth origins. Third, whether self-control was predictive of later deviance (U.S. sample). And finally, what explanation applied to the rates of delinquency in Swiss and American youth. The findings were: (1) Apprentices were more delinquent than Gymnasium students; no difference was found by national origin; (2) self-control during early adolescence was highly predictive of delinquent behavior four years later; and (3) American youths were consistently more delinquent than their Swiss age mates, especially on more serious acts. Although developmental processes in delinquency were similar for both groups, Swiss youth reported closer family relations and a higher level of self-control. These closer family relations and the greater self-control accounted for over 70 percent of the mean level difference in delinquency by nation. The discussion section focuses on implications of this study's findings for the tenets of self-control theory as well as its implications for national differences.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectJuvenile delinquency -- Switzerland.en_US
dc.subjectJuvenile delinquency -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectJuvenile delinquents -- Switzerland.en_US
dc.subjectJuvenile delinquents -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRowe, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGamble, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSilverberg, Sueen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHirschi, Travisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGottfredson, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9534662en_US
dc.identifier.oclc706113799en_US
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