Computer analysis of buckminsterfullerene on a silicon (111)-7 x 7 surface.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187151
Title:
Computer analysis of buckminsterfullerene on a silicon (111)-7 x 7 surface.
Author:
Chen, Jian.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This work uses STM-scanning tunneling microscope and computers to study the interaction of two different materials. The equipment used are STM-scanning tunneling microscopy and computers. The materials are the silicon (111)-7 x 7 surface and the carbon 60. The C₆₀ topic has been widely discussed since 1990. The basic properties of C₆₀ molecules have been reviewed in this work. The silicon surface is important for the current electronic industry, but the silicon surface structure was not well known until 1985. STM is the best technique to image C₆₀ on the silicon surface in the real space domain. In chapter one and chapter two, I discuss the background of this topic and the principles of my experiment. The interaction of C₆₀ with the Si (111)-7 x 7 surface has been seen clearly on STM images, but the nature of the interaction is not well known. The primary question is where these C₆₀ molecules prefer to stay on the Si (111)-7 x 7 surface? I made a computer to answer this question by using a sophisticated program package to do image recognition. To explain the interesting statistical result, a very simple physical model has been constructed and calculations by the theoretical model are fitted to the experiment result. Molecular dynamical computer simulation is one of the most powerful tools for studying assemblies of particles interacting through realistic inter-particle forces. I used this method to calculate the C₆₀ and silicon (111)-7 x 7 in van der Waals force interaction to see if the result can fit the experiment or not. The conclusion is that the interaction between C₆₀ and Si (111)-7 x 7 is not dominated by van der Waals forces. Image processing techniques are very important in this work. I devoted one chapter to describe the image processing in my data analysis. The technique I used here is not only good for the current work, it also could be used in other research areas. Chapter six discusses a simulation calculation to study scanning force microscope tip and sample interaction. The whole chapter is a paper that has been published in Nanotechnology.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Physics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Sarid, Dror; Hill, Henry A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleComputer analysis of buckminsterfullerene on a silicon (111)-7 x 7 surface.en_US
dc.creatorChen, Jian.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Jian.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis work uses STM-scanning tunneling microscope and computers to study the interaction of two different materials. The equipment used are STM-scanning tunneling microscopy and computers. The materials are the silicon (111)-7 x 7 surface and the carbon 60. The C₆₀ topic has been widely discussed since 1990. The basic properties of C₆₀ molecules have been reviewed in this work. The silicon surface is important for the current electronic industry, but the silicon surface structure was not well known until 1985. STM is the best technique to image C₆₀ on the silicon surface in the real space domain. In chapter one and chapter two, I discuss the background of this topic and the principles of my experiment. The interaction of C₆₀ with the Si (111)-7 x 7 surface has been seen clearly on STM images, but the nature of the interaction is not well known. The primary question is where these C₆₀ molecules prefer to stay on the Si (111)-7 x 7 surface? I made a computer to answer this question by using a sophisticated program package to do image recognition. To explain the interesting statistical result, a very simple physical model has been constructed and calculations by the theoretical model are fitted to the experiment result. Molecular dynamical computer simulation is one of the most powerful tools for studying assemblies of particles interacting through realistic inter-particle forces. I used this method to calculate the C₆₀ and silicon (111)-7 x 7 in van der Waals force interaction to see if the result can fit the experiment or not. The conclusion is that the interaction between C₆₀ and Si (111)-7 x 7 is not dominated by van der Waals forces. Image processing techniques are very important in this work. I devoted one chapter to describe the image processing in my data analysis. The technique I used here is not only good for the current work, it also could be used in other research areas. Chapter six discusses a simulation calculation to study scanning force microscope tip and sample interaction. The whole chapter is a paper that has been published in Nanotechnology.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSarid, Droren_US
dc.contributor.chairHill, Henry A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFang, Lizhi Z.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVuillemin, Joseph J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParmenter, Robert H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9534659en_US
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