Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187143
Title:
Competitive control in systems engineering.
Author:
Van Voorhees, Franklin David.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The three main difficulties of the product development process are non-convexity, uncertainty, and multiobjectivity. Because of these problems, the product development process is characterized using two metaphors. The first metaphor is navigating in uncharted waters. The second is the development process as a competition among the various objectives that must be satisfied, including the need to minimize costs and maximize performance. Both of these metaphors lead to the concept of 'good directions' for guiding the development process. Methods of obtaining 'good directions' are described, and fuzziness is recruited to deal with the uncertainties in the direction-finding process. The two main approaches to product development are the optimizing approach and the combinative approach. Experimental designs and genetic algorithms are suggested for efficiently investigating the design space through the correct use of models and prototypes. Experimental designs can be used as part of either the optimizing or the combinative approaches, while the genetic algorithm is more effective for the combinative approach. An innovative approach to robust design is introduced which emphasizes three-level factorial experimental designs. In addition, models of competition are examined as a means of understanding the concepts of competition which are applicable to system theory and systems engineering. Case studies describing the Manhattan Project and the Polaris Program help to illustrate the role of competition in product development.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Systems and Industrial Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bahill, A. Terry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCompetitive control in systems engineering.en_US
dc.creatorVan Voorhees, Franklin David.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Voorhees, Franklin David.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe three main difficulties of the product development process are non-convexity, uncertainty, and multiobjectivity. Because of these problems, the product development process is characterized using two metaphors. The first metaphor is navigating in uncharted waters. The second is the development process as a competition among the various objectives that must be satisfied, including the need to minimize costs and maximize performance. Both of these metaphors lead to the concept of 'good directions' for guiding the development process. Methods of obtaining 'good directions' are described, and fuzziness is recruited to deal with the uncertainties in the direction-finding process. The two main approaches to product development are the optimizing approach and the combinative approach. Experimental designs and genetic algorithms are suggested for efficiently investigating the design space through the correct use of models and prototypes. Experimental designs can be used as part of either the optimizing or the combinative approaches, while the genetic algorithm is more effective for the combinative approach. An innovative approach to robust design is introduced which emphasizes three-level factorial experimental designs. In addition, models of competition are examined as a means of understanding the concepts of competition which are applicable to system theory and systems engineering. Case studies describing the Manhattan Project and the Polaris Program help to illustrate the role of competition in product development.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSystems and Industrial Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBahill, A. Terryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDuckstein, Lucienen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTharp, Hal S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9534654en_US
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