Constructing meaning through multiple sign systems: Literacy in the lives of Lakota and Dakota young adolescents.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187133
Title:
Constructing meaning through multiple sign systems: Literacy in the lives of Lakota and Dakota young adolescents.
Author:
Noll, Elizabeth Kellar.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to explore the roles and uses of multiple literacies in the lives of four Lakota and Dakota (Sioux) young adolescents who live and attend school in a predominantly white community in southeastern South Dakota. Significant to this research is a focus on the perceptions of the participants themselves about their literacy experiences both in and out of school. In addition to describing the participants' uses of reading and writing, this study examines the ways in which they construct meaning through other sign systems such as visual art, music, and movement or dance. As ethnographic case study research, this investigation employs data collection techniques such as participant and non-participant observation, use of fieldnotes, in-depth interviewing, and sampling of literacy artifacts. Also reflective of ethnographic research, this study is developed within historical and sociocultural frameworks. In the review of literature and in the collection of data, the influences of different cultures--American Indian cultures, mainstream culture, school culture, and popular culture--are examined to understand their impact on the participants' transactions with literacy. The findings of this study indicate that the participants' uses of literacy reflect the needs and/or issues that are most central in their lives. Most significantly, the participants use literacy to explore and express their self-identity and to examine issues, such as prejudice, racism, and discrimination, that are critical to them. Another important finding of this study is that the participants possess literacy strengths and knowledge that are not fully revealed within the school setting.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Teton Indians -- Education.; Dakota Indians -- Education.; Teton Indians -- Language.; Dakota Indians -- Language.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading and Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Fox, Dana L.; Goodman, Kenneth S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleConstructing meaning through multiple sign systems: Literacy in the lives of Lakota and Dakota young adolescents.en_US
dc.creatorNoll, Elizabeth Kellar.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNoll, Elizabeth Kellar.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to explore the roles and uses of multiple literacies in the lives of four Lakota and Dakota (Sioux) young adolescents who live and attend school in a predominantly white community in southeastern South Dakota. Significant to this research is a focus on the perceptions of the participants themselves about their literacy experiences both in and out of school. In addition to describing the participants' uses of reading and writing, this study examines the ways in which they construct meaning through other sign systems such as visual art, music, and movement or dance. As ethnographic case study research, this investigation employs data collection techniques such as participant and non-participant observation, use of fieldnotes, in-depth interviewing, and sampling of literacy artifacts. Also reflective of ethnographic research, this study is developed within historical and sociocultural frameworks. In the review of literature and in the collection of data, the influences of different cultures--American Indian cultures, mainstream culture, school culture, and popular culture--are examined to understand their impact on the participants' transactions with literacy. The findings of this study indicate that the participants' uses of literacy reflect the needs and/or issues that are most central in their lives. Most significantly, the participants use literacy to explore and express their self-identity and to examine issues, such as prejudice, racism, and discrimination, that are critical to them. Another important finding of this study is that the participants possess literacy strengths and knowledge that are not fully revealed within the school setting.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTeton Indians -- Education.en_US
dc.subjectDakota Indians -- Education.en_US
dc.subjectTeton Indians -- Language.en_US
dc.subjectDakota Indians -- Language.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairFox, Dana L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairGoodman, Kenneth S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9531151en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704377535en_US
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