Assessing competing models of resource allocation at a public research I university through multivariate analysis of state financing.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187123
Title:
Assessing competing models of resource allocation at a public research I university through multivariate analysis of state financing.
Author:
Volk, Cindy Ellerman.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Patterns of resource allocation have been studied by a variety of researchers, but this study includes variables in ways that they have not been operationalized or featured in previous studies. The purpose of this study is to analyze patterns of resource allocation across different academic units within a major research university. Eighty-five departments were studied with data gathered for the years 1988-89 and 1992-93. Twenty-six independent variables were analyzed including rational/political and critical/political framework variables. The dependent variable was the amount of state allocations to each academic unit. Regression and correlation analyses indicated that grants/contracts, gender, and ethnicity were highly significant factors in determining the amount of state dollar allocations to a department. Departments generating more in external grants/contracts received more in terms of state allocated dollars to the unit. Departments with higher percentages of women faculty and minority faculty tended to receive less in terms of state allocations. The rational/political theory more adequately described graduate education, while the critical/political theory described undergraduate education. Future research may need to include the effect of complex missions and multiple labor markets on education.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Slaughter, Sheila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAssessing competing models of resource allocation at a public research I university through multivariate analysis of state financing.en_US
dc.creatorVolk, Cindy Ellerman.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVolk, Cindy Ellerman.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPatterns of resource allocation have been studied by a variety of researchers, but this study includes variables in ways that they have not been operationalized or featured in previous studies. The purpose of this study is to analyze patterns of resource allocation across different academic units within a major research university. Eighty-five departments were studied with data gathered for the years 1988-89 and 1992-93. Twenty-six independent variables were analyzed including rational/political and critical/political framework variables. The dependent variable was the amount of state allocations to each academic unit. Regression and correlation analyses indicated that grants/contracts, gender, and ethnicity were highly significant factors in determining the amount of state dollar allocations to a department. Departments generating more in external grants/contracts received more in terms of state allocated dollars to the unit. Departments with higher percentages of women faculty and minority faculty tended to receive less in terms of state allocations. The rational/political theory more adequately described graduate education, while the critical/political theory described undergraduate education. Future research may need to include the effect of complex missions and multiple labor markets on education.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEngland, Paulaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9531142en_US
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