Protecting the public's trust: A search for balance among benefits and conflicts in university-industry relationships.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187110
Title:
Protecting the public's trust: A search for balance among benefits and conflicts in university-industry relationships.
Author:
Campbell, Teresa Isabelle Daza.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
As the economy shifts from a heavy emphasis on defense science and technology to a focus on the application of innovation to commercial markets, decision makers are eager to learn how to shape successful university-industry partnerships. Given that the trend is toward greater numbers of relationships, this national survey project investigated whether scientists and administrators involved in university-industry cooperation share similar perspectives. It explored the benefits, conflicts and mechanisms related to collaborative activity, and sought to determine the implications for universities, industry, and policies directed towards this collaborative activity. Sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation, this study is one of the first to solicit responses from persons not involved in university-industry collaborative activity as well as from those who are. This research successfully captured three aspects of conflicts: conflict of interest, conflict of commitment and conflict over internal equity. The study found that conflict of interest turns on potential financial gain and revenue generating activities. Conflict of commitment is viewed in terms of responsibility and loyalty to the academic or industrial sector to which the individual belongs. Conflict over internal equity centers on traditional academic duties such as teaching and interaction with students. The primary benefits society will receive as a result of collaborative activity are new knowledge and know-how of new techniques and technologies. Regarding specific mechanisms preferred by survey respondents, collaborative universities and firms will rely heavily on conflict of interest policies guide appropriate activities. These should be specific enough to counsel an individual who has come to a decision point with regard to loyalties and at the same time be general enough to treat each collaborative endeavor on its unique merits. Regardless of the type of collaborative relationship in which academics become involved, the study found that decision makers should hold firm in their promotion of teaching and equitable treatment of students. In order to be true to their academic identity, university representatives should ensure the scale is tipped in favor of teaching, or delicately balanced so that teaching activities are equal to collaborative activities.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Industry and education.; Joint ventures.; Strategic alliances (Business); Conflict of interests.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Slaughter, Sheila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleProtecting the public's trust: A search for balance among benefits and conflicts in university-industry relationships.en_US
dc.creatorCampbell, Teresa Isabelle Daza.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Teresa Isabelle Daza.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs the economy shifts from a heavy emphasis on defense science and technology to a focus on the application of innovation to commercial markets, decision makers are eager to learn how to shape successful university-industry partnerships. Given that the trend is toward greater numbers of relationships, this national survey project investigated whether scientists and administrators involved in university-industry cooperation share similar perspectives. It explored the benefits, conflicts and mechanisms related to collaborative activity, and sought to determine the implications for universities, industry, and policies directed towards this collaborative activity. Sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation, this study is one of the first to solicit responses from persons not involved in university-industry collaborative activity as well as from those who are. This research successfully captured three aspects of conflicts: conflict of interest, conflict of commitment and conflict over internal equity. The study found that conflict of interest turns on potential financial gain and revenue generating activities. Conflict of commitment is viewed in terms of responsibility and loyalty to the academic or industrial sector to which the individual belongs. Conflict over internal equity centers on traditional academic duties such as teaching and interaction with students. The primary benefits society will receive as a result of collaborative activity are new knowledge and know-how of new techniques and technologies. Regarding specific mechanisms preferred by survey respondents, collaborative universities and firms will rely heavily on conflict of interest policies guide appropriate activities. These should be specific enough to counsel an individual who has come to a decision point with regard to loyalties and at the same time be general enough to treat each collaborative endeavor on its unique merits. Regardless of the type of collaborative relationship in which academics become involved, the study found that decision makers should hold firm in their promotion of teaching and equitable treatment of students. In order to be true to their academic identity, university representatives should ensure the scale is tipped in favor of teaching, or delicately balanced so that teaching activities are equal to collaborative activities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIndustry and education.en_US
dc.subjectJoint ventures.en_US
dc.subjectStrategic alliances (Business)en_US
dc.subjectConflict of interests.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeckler, Susan E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9531129en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703889103en_US
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