Ambiguity, precision, and choice: A fuzzy trace theory analysis of framing effects in decision-making under uncertainty.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187093
Title:
Ambiguity, precision, and choice: A fuzzy trace theory analysis of framing effects in decision-making under uncertainty.
Author:
Fulginiti, John Vincent
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Framing effects are inconsistencies in preference across transformations in stimulus content. In this study, I present two experiments designed to test the descriptive power of two competing theories of cognitive aspects of framing effects in choice. Traditional explanations for framing effects, such as prospect theory, suggest that choice is a function of operations on numerical elements of risky stimuli. Cognition is presumed to be quantitative in nature, including diminishing returns for the values of outcomes and discounting of probabilities. In contrast, fuzzy trace theory, a relatively new conceptualization of cognition with very different assumptions than psychophysical approaches, suggests framing effects result from qualitative processing of decision components. Participants chose between certain and risky alternatives across a variety of reflection problems. Dependent variables in these experiments include choice, confidence in choice, a sensitive weighted measure called signed confidence, and response latency. Results of both experiments suggest failures of the psychophysical approach, and highlight successful predictions based on fuzzy trace theory. These predictions are based on four principles of the fuzzy trace theory intuitive approach to cognition: gist extraction, the hierarchy of gist, the fuzzy to verbatim continuum of memorial representations, and the fuzzy processing preference. The results tend to refute explanations of framing effects as being computationally and quantitatively driven and support explanations based on qualitative processing. Intuition, rather than human information processing, is an elegant description of decision making under uncertainty.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Reyna, Valerie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAmbiguity, precision, and choice: A fuzzy trace theory analysis of framing effects in decision-making under uncertainty.en_US
dc.creatorFulginiti, John Vincenten_US
dc.contributor.authorFulginiti, John Vincenten_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFraming effects are inconsistencies in preference across transformations in stimulus content. In this study, I present two experiments designed to test the descriptive power of two competing theories of cognitive aspects of framing effects in choice. Traditional explanations for framing effects, such as prospect theory, suggest that choice is a function of operations on numerical elements of risky stimuli. Cognition is presumed to be quantitative in nature, including diminishing returns for the values of outcomes and discounting of probabilities. In contrast, fuzzy trace theory, a relatively new conceptualization of cognition with very different assumptions than psychophysical approaches, suggests framing effects result from qualitative processing of decision components. Participants chose between certain and risky alternatives across a variety of reflection problems. Dependent variables in these experiments include choice, confidence in choice, a sensitive weighted measure called signed confidence, and response latency. Results of both experiments suggest failures of the psychophysical approach, and highlight successful predictions based on fuzzy trace theory. These predictions are based on four principles of the fuzzy trace theory intuitive approach to cognition: gist extraction, the hierarchy of gist, the fuzzy to verbatim continuum of memorial representations, and the fuzzy processing preference. The results tend to refute explanations of framing effects as being computationally and quantitatively driven and support explanations based on qualitative processing. Intuition, rather than human information processing, is an elegant description of decision making under uncertainty.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairReyna, Valerieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSabers, Darrellen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9531113en_US
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