Developing transfer and metacognition in educationally disadvantaged students: Effects of the Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) program.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187075
Title:
Developing transfer and metacognition in educationally disadvantaged students: Effects of the Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) program.
Author:
Darmer, Mary Ann
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research posits that it is possible to develop transferable metacognitive skills in educationally disadvantaged students with consistent and intensive instruction in higher order thinking skills. The 53 subjects in this study were fourth and fifth grade Native American (41%) and non-Native American (59%) students whose reading comprehension scores fell between the 15th and 40th percentile. Students in the experimental group were placed in the Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) Program for one year. A comparison group of 49 students with equivalent reading scores received traditional Chapter 1 services. Metacognitive growth was measured using six instruments: cognitive abilities measures, reading comprehension scores, academic grade point averages, writing skills, novel problem solving tasks, and a metacognitive questionnaire. The instruments contained a total of 15 measures with multiple comparisons. Both Native American and Hispanic HOTS students made significant growth on 22 out of 22 comparisons. Twelve comparisons were made between HOTS students and control groups. HOTS students significantly and substantially outscored the control groups in all 12 comparisons. This research found that the HOTS Program is an exemplary instructional approach to helping educationally disadvantaged students in grades 4-7 as compared to traditional Chapter 1 methods. HOTS produces substantial growth on a wide variety of outcomes. The gains appear to result from far transfer of the metacognitive skills developed by the HOTS students. All HOTS students made substantial academic gains in the regular classroom across the content areas despite the fact that HOTS is a pullout program with little linkage to classroom content. Thirty-four percent of the HOTS students made the honor roll. At the same time the GPA of the control students who received supplementary drill and content instruction, and who spent more time in the classroom, declined. This suggests the primary determinant of the effects of a program has nothing to do with whether a program is pullout, but is strictly a function of the instructional design of the program.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Administration and Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Pogrow, Stanley

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDeveloping transfer and metacognition in educationally disadvantaged students: Effects of the Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) program.en_US
dc.creatorDarmer, Mary Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorDarmer, Mary Annen_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research posits that it is possible to develop transferable metacognitive skills in educationally disadvantaged students with consistent and intensive instruction in higher order thinking skills. The 53 subjects in this study were fourth and fifth grade Native American (41%) and non-Native American (59%) students whose reading comprehension scores fell between the 15th and 40th percentile. Students in the experimental group were placed in the Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) Program for one year. A comparison group of 49 students with equivalent reading scores received traditional Chapter 1 services. Metacognitive growth was measured using six instruments: cognitive abilities measures, reading comprehension scores, academic grade point averages, writing skills, novel problem solving tasks, and a metacognitive questionnaire. The instruments contained a total of 15 measures with multiple comparisons. Both Native American and Hispanic HOTS students made significant growth on 22 out of 22 comparisons. Twelve comparisons were made between HOTS students and control groups. HOTS students significantly and substantially outscored the control groups in all 12 comparisons. This research found that the HOTS Program is an exemplary instructional approach to helping educationally disadvantaged students in grades 4-7 as compared to traditional Chapter 1 methods. HOTS produces substantial growth on a wide variety of outcomes. The gains appear to result from far transfer of the metacognitive skills developed by the HOTS students. All HOTS students made substantial academic gains in the regular classroom across the content areas despite the fact that HOTS is a pullout program with little linkage to classroom content. Thirty-four percent of the HOTS students made the honor roll. At the same time the GPA of the control students who received supplementary drill and content instruction, and who spent more time in the classroom, declined. This suggests the primary determinant of the effects of a program has nothing to do with whether a program is pullout, but is strictly a function of the instructional design of the program.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administration and Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairPogrow, Stanleyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAmes, Wilbur S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKirby, Danielen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9531097en_US
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