Factors that increase the academic success of low-track Hispanic students in a community college.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187070
Title:
Factors that increase the academic success of low-track Hispanic students in a community college.
Author:
Hall, James Arnold
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe the factors that helped to increase the academic success of 13 low-track Hispanic students who attended a local community college. The participants graduated from a nearby high school within the service district of the community college in 1991 or 1992. They were chosen from among other low-track students at the community college using the following criterion: At the conclusion of their freshman year in college, they had completed at least 24 units with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. These students, who were designated as "outlying students," provided the data for the study. Data were collected using (1) the students' high school and college permanent records, (2) a personal survey form, and (3) a personal interview with each student. The data provided the researcher with evidence that the students perceived the following factors as key to increasing their academic success at the community college: (1) The students' high personal perceptions of themselves and their high regard for receiving a postsecondary education and a degree. (2) The college instructors' concern for them, which provided a support system that enabled them to complete their courses successfully. (3) The college's remedial program, which provided the outlying students with a means for bringing their academic skills up to a level that would allow them to cope successfully with college academic demands. (4) The support system provided by their parents, which furnished not only "human support" (money, clothing, etc.), but also "emotional support" (encouragement and purpose). Although this research was limited in sample size, it provided the researcher, a community college instructor, with several suggestions for helping the community college to provide services to help low-track students to achieve academic success.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Community colleges -- Arizona.; Community college students -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Administration and Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Medina, Marcello Jr.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFactors that increase the academic success of low-track Hispanic students in a community college.en_US
dc.creatorHall, James Arnolden_US
dc.contributor.authorHall, James Arnolden_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe the factors that helped to increase the academic success of 13 low-track Hispanic students who attended a local community college. The participants graduated from a nearby high school within the service district of the community college in 1991 or 1992. They were chosen from among other low-track students at the community college using the following criterion: At the conclusion of their freshman year in college, they had completed at least 24 units with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. These students, who were designated as "outlying students," provided the data for the study. Data were collected using (1) the students' high school and college permanent records, (2) a personal survey form, and (3) a personal interview with each student. The data provided the researcher with evidence that the students perceived the following factors as key to increasing their academic success at the community college: (1) The students' high personal perceptions of themselves and their high regard for receiving a postsecondary education and a degree. (2) The college instructors' concern for them, which provided a support system that enabled them to complete their courses successfully. (3) The college's remedial program, which provided the outlying students with a means for bringing their academic skills up to a level that would allow them to cope successfully with college academic demands. (4) The support system provided by their parents, which furnished not only "human support" (money, clothing, etc.), but also "emotional support" (encouragement and purpose). Although this research was limited in sample size, it provided the researcher, a community college instructor, with several suggestions for helping the community college to provide services to help low-track students to achieve academic success.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCommunity colleges -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectCommunity college students -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administration and Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMedina, Marcello Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAmes, Wilbur S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPate, Glenn S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9531092en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701551708en_US
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