Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187043
Title:
Mao Zedong's world view: From youth to Yanan.
Author:
Xin, Jianfei.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The main thrust of this research is to explore Mao Zedong's world view from his youth to Yanan (1941), a relatively neglected period in academic circles. A thorough examination of Mao's writings, speeches and behaviors is believed the most complete and systematic discussion on the subject. The findings, through the analysis moving from vertical to horizontal, from micro to macro, from concrete to abstract, have bridged the gap in our knowledge. Two interrelated hypotheses are suggested at the outset: (1) Mao had built up a long-time international sense and perspective since he was very young, (2) Mao had shaped his own world view during the defined period at both concrete and abstract levels. They have gained factual and logical validation. A chronological, periodized, and overall outlook portrays Mao as a lively world observer, an enthusiastic commentator, and a bold predictor. Mao's judgments, inferences, and perceptions, whether accurate or erroneous, were the reflection of the connection between the real (objective) world and Mao's mental (subjective) world, either concordant or discrepant. Mao's subjective world was composed of various elements, mainly, nationalist mentality, revolutionary interest and values, historical and cultural heritages, and personal experiences and characteristics. Mao's perceptions of the world as a whole and his images of the major powers, especially Mao's relations with Soviet Union, provide a concrete framework of his world view at empirical basis. A macro analysis of world view-related three groups of concepts (foreign affairs related concepts, famous revolutionary concepts and philosophical concepts) offers abstract principles of Mao's world view at conceptual level. His belief of "understanding the world and changing the world" shows distinctive philosophical ground. Mao's preference of change, struggle, unevenness, and flexibility had particular significance for featuring his world view. Four intellectual sources contributed to Mao's world view, such as: older Chinese traditions, the newly emerged tradition in modern China, western thought and learning, and Marxism-Leninism. Each of them functioned to influence Mao's world view in one way or another. Mao proved to be an eclectic with the label of sinicized Marxism.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Political science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
East Asian Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Whiting, Allen S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMao Zedong's world view: From youth to Yanan.en_US
dc.creatorXin, Jianfei.en_US
dc.contributor.authorXin, Jianfei.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe main thrust of this research is to explore Mao Zedong's world view from his youth to Yanan (1941), a relatively neglected period in academic circles. A thorough examination of Mao's writings, speeches and behaviors is believed the most complete and systematic discussion on the subject. The findings, through the analysis moving from vertical to horizontal, from micro to macro, from concrete to abstract, have bridged the gap in our knowledge. Two interrelated hypotheses are suggested at the outset: (1) Mao had built up a long-time international sense and perspective since he was very young, (2) Mao had shaped his own world view during the defined period at both concrete and abstract levels. They have gained factual and logical validation. A chronological, periodized, and overall outlook portrays Mao as a lively world observer, an enthusiastic commentator, and a bold predictor. Mao's judgments, inferences, and perceptions, whether accurate or erroneous, were the reflection of the connection between the real (objective) world and Mao's mental (subjective) world, either concordant or discrepant. Mao's subjective world was composed of various elements, mainly, nationalist mentality, revolutionary interest and values, historical and cultural heritages, and personal experiences and characteristics. Mao's perceptions of the world as a whole and his images of the major powers, especially Mao's relations with Soviet Union, provide a concrete framework of his world view at empirical basis. A macro analysis of world view-related three groups of concepts (foreign affairs related concepts, famous revolutionary concepts and philosophical concepts) offers abstract principles of Mao's world view at conceptual level. His belief of "understanding the world and changing the world" shows distinctive philosophical ground. Mao's preference of change, struggle, unevenness, and flexibility had particular significance for featuring his world view. Four intellectual sources contributed to Mao's world view, such as: older Chinese traditions, the newly emerged tradition in modern China, western thought and learning, and Marxism-Leninism. Each of them functioned to influence Mao's world view in one way or another. Mao proved to be an eclectic with the label of sinicized Marxism.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPolitical science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEast Asian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWhiting, Allen S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHedtke, Charlesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPao Tao, Chia-linen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9531068en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702453738en_US
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