Special education: The status of special education services in Indian band-operated schools in Manitoba.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187017
Title:
Special education: The status of special education services in Indian band-operated schools in Manitoba.
Author:
Phillips, Ronald Sydney.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
For many years Indian students requiring special education services were sent to provincial schools where services were provided. In 1985, the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) began providing funds to Indian band-operated schools for support of special education services. During the past nine years, parents, teachers, and administrators of band-operated schools have expressed concerned about the lack of and the quality of special education services in band-operated schools. There is an absence of information regarding the provision of special education services in band-operated schools in Manitoba. The purpose of this study is to describe the status of special education in these schools. The methodology of this study included surveys and in-depth interviews with principals of six band-operated schools in Manitoba. Two schools were randomly selected from each of three student enrollment categories (1200-750; 650-300; and 150-50). The major findings of this study confirm the concerns of parents, teachers, and administrators that the special education delivery system is not meeting the needs of disabled Indian students. Reasons for the lack of comprehensive services included: inefficient administrative structure; insufficient numbers of trained personnel; inconsistency of programs and services; absence of operating procedures; and lack of parent and community involvement. Eight activities are recommended for improving the quantity and quality of special education services to Canadian Indian children. First, planning committees need to be established at the band-operated school and tribal council level to develop cooperative plans for providing special education services to meet existing needs. Second, an Indian controlled special education organization should be developed consisting of band-operated schools, tribal councils, and a provincial agency. Such an organization can develop, support, and monitor special education activities. Third, the kinds and numbers of special education personnel must be increased. Fourth, there is a need to develop special education programs and services. Fifth, policies for efficient and effective operating procedures need to be written. Sixth, all students needing special education services should be identified and served. Seventh, parent and community involvement with band-operated schools must be encouraged. Eighth, additional research is needed in other Indian band-operated schools and reserves before these findings can be generalized.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
School social work.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Chalfant, James C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSpecial education: The status of special education services in Indian band-operated schools in Manitoba.en_US
dc.creatorPhillips, Ronald Sydney.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Ronald Sydney.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFor many years Indian students requiring special education services were sent to provincial schools where services were provided. In 1985, the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) began providing funds to Indian band-operated schools for support of special education services. During the past nine years, parents, teachers, and administrators of band-operated schools have expressed concerned about the lack of and the quality of special education services in band-operated schools. There is an absence of information regarding the provision of special education services in band-operated schools in Manitoba. The purpose of this study is to describe the status of special education in these schools. The methodology of this study included surveys and in-depth interviews with principals of six band-operated schools in Manitoba. Two schools were randomly selected from each of three student enrollment categories (1200-750; 650-300; and 150-50). The major findings of this study confirm the concerns of parents, teachers, and administrators that the special education delivery system is not meeting the needs of disabled Indian students. Reasons for the lack of comprehensive services included: inefficient administrative structure; insufficient numbers of trained personnel; inconsistency of programs and services; absence of operating procedures; and lack of parent and community involvement. Eight activities are recommended for improving the quantity and quality of special education services to Canadian Indian children. First, planning committees need to be established at the band-operated school and tribal council level to develop cooperative plans for providing special education services to meet existing needs. Second, an Indian controlled special education organization should be developed consisting of band-operated schools, tribal councils, and a provincial agency. Such an organization can develop, support, and monitor special education activities. Third, the kinds and numbers of special education personnel must be increased. Fourth, there is a need to develop special education programs and services. Fifth, policies for efficient and effective operating procedures need to be written. Sixth, all students needing special education services should be identified and served. Seventh, parent and community involvement with band-operated schools must be encouraged. Eighth, additional research is needed in other Indian band-operated schools and reserves before these findings can be generalized.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSchool social work.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairChalfant, James C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUmbreit, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFletcher, Todden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeckman, Paul E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaunders, Franken_US
dc.identifier.proquest9527980en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704273765en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.