Preservice teachers' perceptions of themselves as learners, readers, and teachers in a children's literature classroom.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187014
Title:
Preservice teachers' perceptions of themselves as learners, readers, and teachers in a children's literature classroom.
Author:
Mathis, Janelle Brown
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Preservice teachers' perceptions of their learning, reading, and teaching in an experientially designed course, Children's Literature in the Classroom, is the focus of this study. Qualitative methods included data sources such as initial student surveys, written early literacy memories, audiotaped and transcribed discussions of children's and adolescent literature, mid-term and final self-evaluations, audiotaped and transcribed exit interviews, and various written artifacts created throughout the semester. Several levels of data analysis were used to discover answers to the following questions: What do preservice teachers view as the purpose of this course for themselves personally and professionally? What role do they see literature playing in learning, reading, and teaching? What class experiences were most significant to students? What are preservice teachers' perceptions of themselves and children as learners, readers, and teachers? Each question was extended by also examining the new understandings that were constructed during the many transactions within the semester. The findings of the study emphasized the positive learning experiences within the constructivist framework of this course. Concerning the purpose of the course and children's literature, class members gained a knowledge base in children's literature and an understanding through experience of the purpose and implementation of literature in the classroom. The most significant course aspect was stated as literature discussion groups. Reasons given for this included the personal experiences shared, the various understandings of literature through diverse responses, and the meaning making about text and life that transpired. As learners, preservice teachers developed a greater understanding of the complexities of learning as well as professional knowledge about literature and its use. As readers, they discovered new insights into the reading process, and for many a renewed love of reading emerged. As teachers, they constructed new attitudes and beliefs about teaching in addition to resources and professional preparation gained from the course. Three case studies showed how class members who had very different perceptions of how they best learned were all supported in their construction of knowledge within the class.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Teachers -- Training of.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading and Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Short, Kathy G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePreservice teachers' perceptions of themselves as learners, readers, and teachers in a children's literature classroom.en_US
dc.creatorMathis, Janelle Brownen_US
dc.contributor.authorMathis, Janelle Brownen_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPreservice teachers' perceptions of their learning, reading, and teaching in an experientially designed course, Children's Literature in the Classroom, is the focus of this study. Qualitative methods included data sources such as initial student surveys, written early literacy memories, audiotaped and transcribed discussions of children's and adolescent literature, mid-term and final self-evaluations, audiotaped and transcribed exit interviews, and various written artifacts created throughout the semester. Several levels of data analysis were used to discover answers to the following questions: What do preservice teachers view as the purpose of this course for themselves personally and professionally? What role do they see literature playing in learning, reading, and teaching? What class experiences were most significant to students? What are preservice teachers' perceptions of themselves and children as learners, readers, and teachers? Each question was extended by also examining the new understandings that were constructed during the many transactions within the semester. The findings of the study emphasized the positive learning experiences within the constructivist framework of this course. Concerning the purpose of the course and children's literature, class members gained a knowledge base in children's literature and an understanding through experience of the purpose and implementation of literature in the classroom. The most significant course aspect was stated as literature discussion groups. Reasons given for this included the personal experiences shared, the various understandings of literature through diverse responses, and the meaning making about text and life that transpired. As learners, preservice teachers developed a greater understanding of the complexities of learning as well as professional knowledge about literature and its use. As readers, they discovered new insights into the reading process, and for many a renewed love of reading emerged. As teachers, they constructed new attitudes and beliefs about teaching in addition to resources and professional preparation gained from the course. Three case studies showed how class members who had very different perceptions of how they best learned were all supported in their construction of knowledge within the class.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTeachers -- Training of.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRichardson, Virginiaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnders, Patricia L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9527977en_US
dc.identifier.oclc173479620en_US
dc.identifier.oclc70326511en_US
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