Attention impairments in individuals with aphasia due to anterior versus posterior left hemisphere lesions.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187004
Title:
Attention impairments in individuals with aphasia due to anterior versus posterior left hemisphere lesions.
Author:
Murray, Laura Lynne.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A growing body of literature has documented attention impairments in individuals with aphasia. This study extended that literature by examining the effects of lesion location (anterior versus posterior left hemisphere lesion) and nature of distractor task (nonverbal versus verbal) on aphasic individuals' performances of a variety of listening and speaking tasks under isolation, focused and divided attention conditions. Across tasks, conditions, and experiments, both anterior and posterior groups of aphasic individuals demonstrated greater disruption of language skills than a group of healthy individuals. Although it was initially hypothesized that the anterior group would display greater attention impairments than the posterior group, few differences were found; generally, the two aphasic groups performed similarly, both quantitatively and qualitatively. Independent of group, all individuals showed greater disruption of listening and speaking skills when the distractor task was verbal rather than nonverbal in nature. Performance decrements on most tasks were poorly predicted by severity of language impairment, time post-onset and other demographic characteristics of the aphasic individuals. Within a capacity framework of attention, the results of this study suggest that the attention impairments of aphasic individuals may reflect one or a combination of the following: decreased attentional capacity, inefficient attention allocation, or poor task-demand evaluation.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Aphasia.; Attention.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Speech and Hearing Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Holland, Audrey

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAttention impairments in individuals with aphasia due to anterior versus posterior left hemisphere lesions.en_US
dc.creatorMurray, Laura Lynne.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Laura Lynne.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA growing body of literature has documented attention impairments in individuals with aphasia. This study extended that literature by examining the effects of lesion location (anterior versus posterior left hemisphere lesion) and nature of distractor task (nonverbal versus verbal) on aphasic individuals' performances of a variety of listening and speaking tasks under isolation, focused and divided attention conditions. Across tasks, conditions, and experiments, both anterior and posterior groups of aphasic individuals demonstrated greater disruption of language skills than a group of healthy individuals. Although it was initially hypothesized that the anterior group would display greater attention impairments than the posterior group, few differences were found; generally, the two aphasic groups performed similarly, both quantitatively and qualitatively. Independent of group, all individuals showed greater disruption of listening and speaking skills when the distractor task was verbal rather than nonverbal in nature. Performance decrements on most tasks were poorly predicted by severity of language impairment, time post-onset and other demographic characteristics of the aphasic individuals. Within a capacity framework of attention, the results of this study suggest that the attention impairments of aphasic individuals may reflect one or a combination of the following: decreased attentional capacity, inefficient attention allocation, or poor task-demand evaluation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAphasia.en_US
dc.subjectAttention.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHolland, Audreyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeeson, Pelagieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLaPointe, Leonarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlattke, Theodoreen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHoit, Jeannetteen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9527968en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702372475en_US
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