The nature of dialogue, dialogical relations, and the role of an other: A theoretical and practical conception of dialogue and its role in advancing teacher understanding and practice.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187001
Title:
The nature of dialogue, dialogical relations, and the role of an other: A theoretical and practical conception of dialogue and its role in advancing teacher understanding and practice.
Author:
Vasquez-Levy, Dorothy.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The argument of this thesis is that dialogue, dialogical relations, and an Other (a dialogical partner) create possibilities for engaging teachers in critical reflection about the practical reasoning underlying their teaching. Through dialogue teachers can be enabled to appraise thoughtfully "why" they do what they do and strengthen their justification for practice. Through dialogical relations teachers and an Other can develop shared understandings of pedagogy, teach and learn collaboratively, and generate possibilities for advancing practice. In this study, the Other assisted three secondary teachers in reflective dialogue, over the period of one year. The purposes of the dialogical relations were to help the teachers to elicit their beliefs that guide their teaching, to question premises, and to justify them. By examining the dialogue that occurred throughout the study specific characteristics of dialogue and the dialogical relation emerged. The study reveals types of interruptions that can become a potential barrier to the continuation of productive dialogue (the elicitation, appraisal, and reconstruction of teachers' practical argument). Seven types of interruptions to productive dialogue are identified. The other characteristics of dialogue that are discussed here include instances when dialogue came to a halt, the initiation of dialogue, and constructive processes of productive dialogue. The nature of the dialogical relation is discussed in terms of the dialogical person. The teachers and the Other were found to be dialogical persons. A dialogical person was found to (1) actualize a sense of presentness, (2) be self-disclosing and a listener, (3) be an educator and a learner, (4) display a willfulness to evolve and to assist others in their process of becoming, (5) freely give of him/herself, (6) be tolerant and kindred, (7) exhibit an on-going sense of curiosity, and (8) seek mutual agreement. A dialogical person is a key concept helpful for making sense of some of the complexity in the theoretical conception of the dialogical relation. This work may help to inform the field of teacher education about the practical applications of dialogue, dialogical relations, and the role of the Other--"a critical friend."
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Richardson, Virginia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe nature of dialogue, dialogical relations, and the role of an other: A theoretical and practical conception of dialogue and its role in advancing teacher understanding and practice.en_US
dc.creatorVasquez-Levy, Dorothy.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVasquez-Levy, Dorothy.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe argument of this thesis is that dialogue, dialogical relations, and an Other (a dialogical partner) create possibilities for engaging teachers in critical reflection about the practical reasoning underlying their teaching. Through dialogue teachers can be enabled to appraise thoughtfully "why" they do what they do and strengthen their justification for practice. Through dialogical relations teachers and an Other can develop shared understandings of pedagogy, teach and learn collaboratively, and generate possibilities for advancing practice. In this study, the Other assisted three secondary teachers in reflective dialogue, over the period of one year. The purposes of the dialogical relations were to help the teachers to elicit their beliefs that guide their teaching, to question premises, and to justify them. By examining the dialogue that occurred throughout the study specific characteristics of dialogue and the dialogical relation emerged. The study reveals types of interruptions that can become a potential barrier to the continuation of productive dialogue (the elicitation, appraisal, and reconstruction of teachers' practical argument). Seven types of interruptions to productive dialogue are identified. The other characteristics of dialogue that are discussed here include instances when dialogue came to a halt, the initiation of dialogue, and constructive processes of productive dialogue. The nature of the dialogical relation is discussed in terms of the dialogical person. The teachers and the Other were found to be dialogical persons. A dialogical person was found to (1) actualize a sense of presentness, (2) be self-disclosing and a listener, (3) be an educator and a learner, (4) display a willfulness to evolve and to assist others in their process of becoming, (5) freely give of him/herself, (6) be tolerant and kindred, (7) exhibit an on-going sense of curiosity, and (8) seek mutual agreement. A dialogical person is a key concept helpful for making sense of some of the complexity in the theoretical conception of the dialogical relation. This work may help to inform the field of teacher education about the practical applications of dialogue, dialogical relations, and the role of the Other--"a critical friend."en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRichardson, Virginiaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGriffin, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarter, Kathyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9527966en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.