Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186992
Title:
Environmental impacts of mining on Green Valley, Arizona.
Author:
Kim, Hyo-Sun.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this dissertation is to estimate an empirical model of demand for environmental characteristics for the Green Valley community and to evaluate environmental impacts of mining on the community. Environmental impacts are estimated by two different methodologies: An hedonic price model for housing and a contingent valuation based upon a sample survey of Green Valley residents. Variables that serve as proxies for environmental characteristics in hedonic prices and willingness to pay equations are distance from mining complex and orientation of house (viewscape). These variables are proxies for environmental air quality and scenic quality. Inverse demand equations for environmental variables are derived from the hedonic and contingent valuation analysis. Using these demand relations, environmental impact of mining is estimated as the consumers surplus from environmental quality improvements in Green Valley. In this dissertatlon, consumer surplus is an approximation to the sum of individual surpluses, which allows for variations in specific levels of the specific variables across the individual household. Based upon the number of detached single family homes, the environmental impact of mining on the Green Valley community is estimated by the contingent valuation approach to be approximately $44,000,000 and by the hedonic price approach to be approximately $94,000,000. When impact is based upon total units (detached and nondetached), the environmental impact is estimated by contingent valuation to be approximately $88,000,000 and by the hedonic price approach to be approximately $191,000,000. Perhaps, these estimates bound the actual impact.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Mining and Geological Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Harris, DeVerle P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEnvironmental impacts of mining on Green Valley, Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorKim, Hyo-Sun.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Hyo-Sun.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this dissertation is to estimate an empirical model of demand for environmental characteristics for the Green Valley community and to evaluate environmental impacts of mining on the community. Environmental impacts are estimated by two different methodologies: An hedonic price model for housing and a contingent valuation based upon a sample survey of Green Valley residents. Variables that serve as proxies for environmental characteristics in hedonic prices and willingness to pay equations are distance from mining complex and orientation of house (viewscape). These variables are proxies for environmental air quality and scenic quality. Inverse demand equations for environmental variables are derived from the hedonic and contingent valuation analysis. Using these demand relations, environmental impact of mining is estimated as the consumers surplus from environmental quality improvements in Green Valley. In this dissertatlon, consumer surplus is an approximation to the sum of individual surpluses, which allows for variations in specific levels of the specific variables across the individual household. Based upon the number of detached single family homes, the environmental impact of mining on the Green Valley community is estimated by the contingent valuation approach to be approximately $44,000,000 and by the hedonic price approach to be approximately $94,000,000. When impact is based upon total units (detached and nondetached), the environmental impact is estimated by contingent valuation to be approximately $88,000,000 and by the hedonic price approach to be approximately $191,000,000. Perhaps, these estimates bound the actual impact.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining and Geological Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHarris, DeVerle P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewcomb, Richard T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRieber, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9527957en_US
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