A poetics of resistance: Reading revolutionary memoirs as artifacts of the imagination.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186934
Title:
A poetics of resistance: Reading revolutionary memoirs as artifacts of the imagination.
Author:
Haji, Pamela Watts.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The majority of literary analyses of autobiography has concerned the nature of the relationship of the self to language and the text. Although the literary approach to autobiography has allowed the genre to be received in legitimate literary studies, the study of autobiography has just begun to contribute ethnographic descriptions of human behaviors in sub-groups or cultures as a way of understanding those groups. This study proposes a sub-genre of autobiography, those which emphasize the authors' political resistance activities, and groups these "resistance memoirs" into three classifications: memoirs of self-determination, prison experience, and revolutionary upheavals. This study proposes using an anthropological approach to the behavior of political resistance, and a literary analysis approach to the writing of the memoirs as a way of seeing the patterns of symbolism and metaphor that dominate the authors' own interpretation of his or her activity. Analyzing the authors' political activities as they are textualized reveals the system of resistance. Reading the system of resistance allows us to scrutinize transgression at work. Like any system, resistance is contradictory, paradoxical, and transformative. This study thus proposes to show how resistance activities, as well as resistance memoirs, originate in the human imagination as creative processes. The texts of each set display the creative and transformative ritual activity in consistently patterned ways analyzable in the mode of ethnographic descriptions of ritual behavior, especially ritualized social and cultural transgression. The theoretical fundamentals of both symbolic anthropology and literary interpretation are applied to the behavior of political resistance in order to allow us to read the behavior as a system, a human artifact imaginatively designed--as any art form--to provoke a certain understanding of the world.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Babcock, Barbara

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA poetics of resistance: Reading revolutionary memoirs as artifacts of the imagination.en_US
dc.creatorHaji, Pamela Watts.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHaji, Pamela Watts.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe majority of literary analyses of autobiography has concerned the nature of the relationship of the self to language and the text. Although the literary approach to autobiography has allowed the genre to be received in legitimate literary studies, the study of autobiography has just begun to contribute ethnographic descriptions of human behaviors in sub-groups or cultures as a way of understanding those groups. This study proposes a sub-genre of autobiography, those which emphasize the authors' political resistance activities, and groups these "resistance memoirs" into three classifications: memoirs of self-determination, prison experience, and revolutionary upheavals. This study proposes using an anthropological approach to the behavior of political resistance, and a literary analysis approach to the writing of the memoirs as a way of seeing the patterns of symbolism and metaphor that dominate the authors' own interpretation of his or her activity. Analyzing the authors' political activities as they are textualized reveals the system of resistance. Reading the system of resistance allows us to scrutinize transgression at work. Like any system, resistance is contradictory, paradoxical, and transformative. This study thus proposes to show how resistance activities, as well as resistance memoirs, originate in the human imagination as creative processes. The texts of each set display the creative and transformative ritual activity in consistently patterned ways analyzable in the mode of ethnographic descriptions of ritual behavior, especially ritualized social and cultural transgression. The theoretical fundamentals of both symbolic anthropology and literary interpretation are applied to the behavior of political resistance in order to allow us to read the behavior as a system, a human artifact imaginatively designed--as any art form--to provoke a certain understanding of the world.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBabcock, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEpstein, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCanfield, Dougen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDayan, Joanen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9517548en_US
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