Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186929
Title:
The voice of deceit: Comparing acoustic and perceptual data.
Author:
Rockwell, Patricia Ann.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined the nature of deceptive vocal behavior in interactive situations. It compared those vocal features of deception that can be measured by acoustic equipment with those vocal features of deception that can be measured perceptually by human coders. As deception researchers traditionally measure vocal behavior with either acoustic or perceptual methods, it is uncertain what correspondence, if any, exists between these two methods. This study attempted to determine this correspondence. Deceptive interactions from an earlier study (Buller, Burgoon, Buslig & Roiger, 1993; Burgoon, Buller, Ebesu, White, and Rockwell, 1994) were used to conduct a detailed analysis of vocal features of deceptive speech. The vocal samples were analyzed perceptually and acoustically. Results indicated moderate correlations between some acoustic and perceptual variables, with neither measurement type proving conclusively superior to the other in discriminating between truth and deception. Of three categories examined (time, pitch, and intensity), the time variables of shorter message length, longer response latencies, slower tempo, and less fluency best discriminated between truthful and deceptive statements. Other variables that discriminated truth from deceit were increased intensity range, increased pitch level and variance, and less pleasant vocal quality. Analyses of deception type showed that fabricated deceptions were louder and lower pitched than equivocal deceptions. An analysis of deception planning, showed that planned deceptions exhibited more fluency, a lower pitch level, and less pitch variance than unplanned deceptions. An examination of correlations between deceiver/receiver evaluations of deceiver honesty and deceiver vocal behaviors showed moderate correlations occurred between these evaluations and length of response latencies, pitch level, pitch range, and pitch variance. In general, these findings provide further confirmation of Interpersonal Deception Theory.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Buller, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe voice of deceit: Comparing acoustic and perceptual data.en_US
dc.creatorRockwell, Patricia Ann.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRockwell, Patricia Ann.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the nature of deceptive vocal behavior in interactive situations. It compared those vocal features of deception that can be measured by acoustic equipment with those vocal features of deception that can be measured perceptually by human coders. As deception researchers traditionally measure vocal behavior with either acoustic or perceptual methods, it is uncertain what correspondence, if any, exists between these two methods. This study attempted to determine this correspondence. Deceptive interactions from an earlier study (Buller, Burgoon, Buslig & Roiger, 1993; Burgoon, Buller, Ebesu, White, and Rockwell, 1994) were used to conduct a detailed analysis of vocal features of deceptive speech. The vocal samples were analyzed perceptually and acoustically. Results indicated moderate correlations between some acoustic and perceptual variables, with neither measurement type proving conclusively superior to the other in discriminating between truth and deception. Of three categories examined (time, pitch, and intensity), the time variables of shorter message length, longer response latencies, slower tempo, and less fluency best discriminated between truthful and deceptive statements. Other variables that discriminated truth from deceit were increased intensity range, increased pitch level and variance, and less pleasant vocal quality. Analyses of deception type showed that fabricated deceptions were louder and lower pitched than equivocal deceptions. An analysis of deception planning, showed that planned deceptions exhibited more fluency, a lower pitch level, and less pitch variance than unplanned deceptions. An examination of correlations between deceiver/receiver evaluations of deceiver honesty and deceiver vocal behaviors showed moderate correlations occurred between these evaluations and length of response latencies, pitch level, pitch range, and pitch variance. In general, these findings provide further confirmation of Interpersonal Deception Theory.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBuller, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgoon, Judee K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobs, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreen, Kerryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberQi, Yingyongen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9517543en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.