Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186925
Title:
PERSONAL AND ACADEMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF GI BILL RECIPIENTS.
Author:
CHAPMAN, LARRY ARTHUR.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purposes of this study were to provide a profile of the veteran student in higher education and examine the theory that veteran students perform academically as well as nonveteran students. Research questions were categorized into two main areas of study, personal and academic characteristics, for three groups of college students: veteran GI Bill recipients, nonveteran non-aid recipients, and nonveteran aid recipients. The data for this study were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 (NLS). It was found that veterans were older, predominantly white, single males from a lower socioeconomic status than nonveteran non-aid recipients. Veterans emerged from high school with lower aptitude composite, percentile rank, and grades than nonveterans. It was found that veterans enrolled more often in business programs in public, two-year colleges; completed more certificate programs than two-year or four-year degrees; and received grades comparable to nonveterans. Veterans were employed while students, did not change majors any more often than nonveterans, but did change schools more often. Veterans' reasons for changing majors and schools centered upon their jobs and careers. Fewer veterans continued their education after completion of a four-year degree. Fewer veterans changed their credit load status from full-time to part-time than nonveteran non-aid recipients. More often veterans moved from part-time to full-time status. It was concluded that veterans did perform as well academically as nonveterans in college, even though they did not do as well in high school. Further, there were numerous similarities between veterans who received the GI Bill and nonveterans who received federal financial aid. These results have implications for Congressional and educational leaders. Specific suggestions on ways to utilize the veterans' profile were provided.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Veterans -- Education -- United States.; Veterans -- Scholarships, fellowships, etc. -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePERSONAL AND ACADEMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF GI BILL RECIPIENTS.en_US
dc.creatorCHAPMAN, LARRY ARTHUR.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCHAPMAN, LARRY ARTHUR.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of this study were to provide a profile of the veteran student in higher education and examine the theory that veteran students perform academically as well as nonveteran students. Research questions were categorized into two main areas of study, personal and academic characteristics, for three groups of college students: veteran GI Bill recipients, nonveteran non-aid recipients, and nonveteran aid recipients. The data for this study were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 (NLS). It was found that veterans were older, predominantly white, single males from a lower socioeconomic status than nonveteran non-aid recipients. Veterans emerged from high school with lower aptitude composite, percentile rank, and grades than nonveterans. It was found that veterans enrolled more often in business programs in public, two-year colleges; completed more certificate programs than two-year or four-year degrees; and received grades comparable to nonveterans. Veterans were employed while students, did not change majors any more often than nonveterans, but did change schools more often. Veterans' reasons for changing majors and schools centered upon their jobs and careers. Fewer veterans continued their education after completion of a four-year degree. Fewer veterans changed their credit load status from full-time to part-time than nonveteran non-aid recipients. More often veterans moved from part-time to full-time status. It was concluded that veterans did perform as well academically as nonveterans in college, even though they did not do as well in high school. Further, there were numerous similarities between veterans who received the GI Bill and nonveterans who received federal financial aid. These results have implications for Congressional and educational leaders. Specific suggestions on ways to utilize the veterans' profile were provided.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectVeterans -- Education -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectVeterans -- Scholarships, fellowships, etc. -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarcleroad, Fred F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Arthur T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8323738en_US
dc.identifier.oclc689075163en_US
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