Children's constructive social worlds: Existential lives in the balance.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186921
Title:
Children's constructive social worlds: Existential lives in the balance.
Author:
Andrade, Rosi Ardura Contreras.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Though children are capable of describing themselves and their lives in candid and lucid fashion (e.g., Coles, 1970), their voices are easily supplanted or discredited by the adult (Cahan, Mechling, Sutton-Smith, & White, 1993). A similar phenomenon, girls' loss of self-identity and voice, has been studied by Gilligan (1982). The research design of this dissertation, a qualitative, phenomenological approach, facilitates the documentation of children's social worlds. Extensive observations, interviews, home visits, monolingual and bilingual dialogue journal interactions, and a researcher as "peer" role are among the methodological tools used to provide a panoramic of Mexican and Mexican American language minority children's social worlds. Additionally, the dissertation has been guided by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of children's social worlds and inner lives. This approach is reflected in the dissertation itself, as found, for example, in the following chapters: A Socio-Historic Perspective to Understanding the Development of Childhood in South Tucson, Arizona; A Phenomenological Approach to the Construction of Reality; An Ecological Approach to Human Development and its Social Context; Bronfenbrenner's Ecology of Human Development; and Consequences of El'konin's Theoretical Premise. Children's social worlds or peer cultures are at worst viewed pejoratively, as inferior subcultures, especially for minority children. This perception is misleading, inferring that these worlds are necessarily insignificant and detrimental to the child (Marsh, Rosser & Harre, 1978). Within the many social worlds children create for themselves and those which they participate in, children gain vital knowledge and create networks of support crucial to their development and survival as humans. Those worlds are evidenced in ecological environments where children lead creative, meaningful, and sometimes problematic lives. The educational and societal potential for understanding those social worlds lies in its contributions to the development and practice of pedagogically relevant theory.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading and Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Moll, Luis C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleChildren's constructive social worlds: Existential lives in the balance.en_US
dc.creatorAndrade, Rosi Ardura Contreras.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAndrade, Rosi Ardura Contreras.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThough children are capable of describing themselves and their lives in candid and lucid fashion (e.g., Coles, 1970), their voices are easily supplanted or discredited by the adult (Cahan, Mechling, Sutton-Smith, & White, 1993). A similar phenomenon, girls' loss of self-identity and voice, has been studied by Gilligan (1982). The research design of this dissertation, a qualitative, phenomenological approach, facilitates the documentation of children's social worlds. Extensive observations, interviews, home visits, monolingual and bilingual dialogue journal interactions, and a researcher as "peer" role are among the methodological tools used to provide a panoramic of Mexican and Mexican American language minority children's social worlds. Additionally, the dissertation has been guided by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of children's social worlds and inner lives. This approach is reflected in the dissertation itself, as found, for example, in the following chapters: A Socio-Historic Perspective to Understanding the Development of Childhood in South Tucson, Arizona; A Phenomenological Approach to the Construction of Reality; An Ecological Approach to Human Development and its Social Context; Bronfenbrenner's Ecology of Human Development; and Consequences of El'konin's Theoretical Premise. Children's social worlds or peer cultures are at worst viewed pejoratively, as inferior subcultures, especially for minority children. This perception is misleading, inferring that these worlds are necessarily insignificant and detrimental to the child (Marsh, Rosser & Harre, 1978). Within the many social worlds children create for themselves and those which they participate in, children gain vital knowledge and create networks of support crucial to their development and survival as humans. Those worlds are evidenced in ecological environments where children lead creative, meaningful, and sometimes problematic lives. The educational and societal potential for understanding those social worlds lies in its contributions to the development and practice of pedagogically relevant theory.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCarty, Teresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Richard R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9517537en_US
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