Validating the development of male and female preschoolers' help-seeking, goal-setting and planning, and self-evaluation using latent trait models.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186919
Title:
Validating the development of male and female preschoolers' help-seeking, goal-setting and planning, and self-evaluation using latent trait models.
Author:
Reddy, Linda Ann.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study investigated the early development of three self-regulated learning strategies--help seeking, goal setting and planning, and self evaluation for male and female preschoolers. Skill sequences were developed by identifying demand attributes that imposed requirements on cognitive functioning. The demand attributes of adult assistance and task complexity were identified for all three learning strategies. Variations in adult assistance and task complexity were examined to determine the relative difficulty for male and female preschoolers to perform skills within each learning strategy. This study included data from 10,291 preschoolers, age 2 to 6 years, from Head Start and public preschool programs across the country. The sample included approximately 5,000 males and 5,000 females from culturally diverse backgrounds. Children were assessed by their preschool teachers over two months with a standardized observational assessment instrument. A variety of latent trait models were used to test the developmental skill sequences of these learning strategies in relation to gender. Results revealed that variations in adult assistance and task complexity were related to the relative difficulty in performing these learning strategies. These findings support the notion that adult assistance can enhance the development of preschooler's self-regulated learning strategies. In particular, adult assistance promotes preschoolers' skills to perform simple functions independently and complex functions (e.g., advance planning or checking in parts) with adult help. Gender differences were found in preschoolers' difficulties in self-evaluating and seeking help. For example, females had more difficulty than males checking completed work with adult help and checking an activity in parts with adult help. Males had less difficulty checking a completed activity independently than females. Results also suggested that males are more sensitive to the presence of adult assistance when performing complex checking (i.e., checking in parts) than females. In addition, females were found to be more skilled than males in seeking assistance from adults in the classroom. No gender differences were found in goal setting and planning. The results from this study support the importance of social influences on preschoolers' development of self-regulated learning strategies. Future research directions and implications were also addressed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bergan, John R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleValidating the development of male and female preschoolers' help-seeking, goal-setting and planning, and self-evaluation using latent trait models.en_US
dc.creatorReddy, Linda Ann.en_US
dc.contributor.authorReddy, Linda Ann.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigated the early development of three self-regulated learning strategies--help seeking, goal setting and planning, and self evaluation for male and female preschoolers. Skill sequences were developed by identifying demand attributes that imposed requirements on cognitive functioning. The demand attributes of adult assistance and task complexity were identified for all three learning strategies. Variations in adult assistance and task complexity were examined to determine the relative difficulty for male and female preschoolers to perform skills within each learning strategy. This study included data from 10,291 preschoolers, age 2 to 6 years, from Head Start and public preschool programs across the country. The sample included approximately 5,000 males and 5,000 females from culturally diverse backgrounds. Children were assessed by their preschool teachers over two months with a standardized observational assessment instrument. A variety of latent trait models were used to test the developmental skill sequences of these learning strategies in relation to gender. Results revealed that variations in adult assistance and task complexity were related to the relative difficulty in performing these learning strategies. These findings support the notion that adult assistance can enhance the development of preschooler's self-regulated learning strategies. In particular, adult assistance promotes preschoolers' skills to perform simple functions independently and complex functions (e.g., advance planning or checking in parts) with adult help. Gender differences were found in preschoolers' difficulties in self-evaluating and seeking help. For example, females had more difficulty than males checking completed work with adult help and checking an activity in parts with adult help. Males had less difficulty checking a completed activity independently than females. Results also suggested that males are more sensitive to the presence of adult assistance when performing complex checking (i.e., checking in parts) than females. In addition, females were found to be more skilled than males in seeking assistance from adults in the classroom. No gender differences were found in goal setting and planning. The results from this study support the importance of social influences on preschoolers' development of self-regulated learning strategies. Future research directions and implications were also addressed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBergan, John R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFeld, Jason K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9517535en_US
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