A diachronic study of household food acquisition and consumption strategies in central urban Mexico: An anthropological approach.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186906
Title:
A diachronic study of household food acquisition and consumption strategies in central urban Mexico: An anthropological approach.
Author:
Bernache, Gerardo.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines social processes taking place in Mexico's capital city, the Distrito Federal. This research shows how the Mexican State, during the eighties, adopted a strategy of economic development in which the cost of labor was drastically reduced to benefit industries and businesses. During the period of study, 1980 to 1987, daily minimum wages in the Distrito Federal dropped from 7.01 to 2.94 U.S. dollars. Yearly inflation rates rose from 30 percent in 1980, to 81 percent in 1983, reaching 159 percent in 1987. The impact of depressed salaries and high rates of inflation on household food budget is significant, according to the results. The analysis of 2,325 samples of household food wastes demonstrates that during 1983 and 1987, households in the working and middle classes experienced significant reductions, in comparison to their 1980-baseline level, of food acquisition and consumption.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Velez-Ibanez, Carlos

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA diachronic study of household food acquisition and consumption strategies in central urban Mexico: An anthropological approach.en_US
dc.creatorBernache, Gerardo.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBernache, Gerardo.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines social processes taking place in Mexico's capital city, the Distrito Federal. This research shows how the Mexican State, during the eighties, adopted a strategy of economic development in which the cost of labor was drastically reduced to benefit industries and businesses. During the period of study, 1980 to 1987, daily minimum wages in the Distrito Federal dropped from 7.01 to 2.94 U.S. dollars. Yearly inflation rates rose from 30 percent in 1980, to 81 percent in 1983, reaching 159 percent in 1987. The impact of depressed salaries and high rates of inflation on household food budget is significant, according to the results. The analysis of 2,325 samples of household food wastes demonstrates that during 1983 and 1987, households in the working and middle classes experienced significant reductions, in comparison to their 1980-baseline level, of food acquisition and consumption.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairVelez-Ibanez, Carlosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNugent, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRathje, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchiffer, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9517523en_US
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