Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186865
Title:
Art as mediation for learning: The Arts Integration Program.
Author:
Betts, John David.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study is based on the Arts Integration Program, a series of lesson outlines utilizing fine arts experiences (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) to teach core curriculum subjects. The study took place over two years in six schools, combining qualitative and quantitative research methods to determine: if learning actually took place concurrently with the program's lessons; how the classroom learning environment was affected; and what teachers who use the Arts Integration Program lessons for the first time report about the experience? The study was continued into a second phase based on results of the first. In the development of an Arts Integration Program teacher-mentor model, two teachers from the first year of the study worked with new teachers in their schools who were beginning to use the program. This second phase of the study asked: What is involved in establishing a successful teacher-mentor model with the Arts Integration Program? And, How do the lessons effect the classroom learning environment? Lesson outlines and arts integration techniques are described and results from the Content Area Tests and the Perceived Self-efficacy, Attitude, and Linguistic Domain Questionnaire from both phases of the study are presented. The evolution of the Arts Integration Program Teacher-mentor Model is also described. The process of implementing the program in each school was documented through teacher journals, observations, interviews, and videotapes. The aesthetic reaction that Vygotsky (1971) wrote about seems to be present in these children. Their teachers each report having a more cohesive and supportive classroom environment as a result of the theatre lessons. They all noted improvement in the childrens' communication, expressive and receptive, skills. There is also evidence of transfer into other academic areas. The study showed the more successful Arts Integration Program Teacher-mentor model to be: (1) At least a one-year. (2) Concentrating on one, or two, arts areas. (3) With teacher observing teacher. (4) Regular meeting to plan and discuss. (5) Videotape and review for teachers and students. Plans for future implementation of the Arts Integration Program and ideas for further study are presented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Art -- Study and teaching.; Curriculum planning.; Child development.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading and Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Valmont, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleArt as mediation for learning: The Arts Integration Program.en_US
dc.creatorBetts, John David.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBetts, John David.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study is based on the Arts Integration Program, a series of lesson outlines utilizing fine arts experiences (dance, music, theatre, and visual arts) to teach core curriculum subjects. The study took place over two years in six schools, combining qualitative and quantitative research methods to determine: if learning actually took place concurrently with the program's lessons; how the classroom learning environment was affected; and what teachers who use the Arts Integration Program lessons for the first time report about the experience? The study was continued into a second phase based on results of the first. In the development of an Arts Integration Program teacher-mentor model, two teachers from the first year of the study worked with new teachers in their schools who were beginning to use the program. This second phase of the study asked: What is involved in establishing a successful teacher-mentor model with the Arts Integration Program? And, How do the lessons effect the classroom learning environment? Lesson outlines and arts integration techniques are described and results from the Content Area Tests and the Perceived Self-efficacy, Attitude, and Linguistic Domain Questionnaire from both phases of the study are presented. The evolution of the Arts Integration Program Teacher-mentor Model is also described. The process of implementing the program in each school was documented through teacher journals, observations, interviews, and videotapes. The aesthetic reaction that Vygotsky (1971) wrote about seems to be present in these children. Their teachers each report having a more cohesive and supportive classroom environment as a result of the theatre lessons. They all noted improvement in the childrens' communication, expressive and receptive, skills. There is also evidence of transfer into other academic areas. The study showed the more successful Arts Integration Program Teacher-mentor model to be: (1) At least a one-year. (2) Concentrating on one, or two, arts areas. (3) With teacher observing teacher. (4) Regular meeting to plan and discuss. (5) Videotape and review for teachers and students. Plans for future implementation of the Arts Integration Program and ideas for further study are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectArt -- Study and teaching.en_US
dc.subjectCurriculum planning.en_US
dc.subjectChild development.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairValmont, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9506996en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703158758en_US
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