The intersection of curriculum and pedagogy: A teacher's theory of content.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186826
Title:
The intersection of curriculum and pedagogy: A teacher's theory of content.
Author:
Riney, Mark Reisz.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This case study is an examination of a high school English teacher's role in the curriculum process. The researcher wrote a "grammar" of a teacher's conception or theory of her subject matter from the perspective of its enactment as curriculum events. In other words, her theory of content was studied to provide an indepth examination of the teacher's role as a transformative agent of curriculum. Three different constructs were employed to capture various expressions of her theory of content during her six weeks unit on the Odyssey: (1) interviews, (2) individual lessons, and (3) academic tasks. The researcher found that the teacher had a visible theory of her subject matter. For example, she organized her curriculum around different genres (e.g., epic, tragedy, comedy, etc.), and she exposed her students to the structure of the epic. Also, her theory of literary criticism was influenced by American formalism and archetypal criticism. These schools of literary criticism complemented each other. Her version of formalism gave her a specific vocabulary and a general method to teach students to explicate literature in general. She emphasized close textual reading and required to support their ideas with passages from the text. Also, she used Joseph Campbell's monomyth to structure the narrative of the Odyssey, and she encouraged students to relate themes and symbols to their own lives and to society in general. She stressed that the Odyssey is an archetypal myth that is relevant to every epoch. In short, this study illustrates that curriculum and pedagogy are intertwined; her version of literary criticism is a pedagogy in itself, a pedagogy that is unified with--not separated from--content.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Doyle, Walter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe intersection of curriculum and pedagogy: A teacher's theory of content.en_US
dc.creatorRiney, Mark Reisz.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRiney, Mark Reisz.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis case study is an examination of a high school English teacher's role in the curriculum process. The researcher wrote a "grammar" of a teacher's conception or theory of her subject matter from the perspective of its enactment as curriculum events. In other words, her theory of content was studied to provide an indepth examination of the teacher's role as a transformative agent of curriculum. Three different constructs were employed to capture various expressions of her theory of content during her six weeks unit on the Odyssey: (1) interviews, (2) individual lessons, and (3) academic tasks. The researcher found that the teacher had a visible theory of her subject matter. For example, she organized her curriculum around different genres (e.g., epic, tragedy, comedy, etc.), and she exposed her students to the structure of the epic. Also, her theory of literary criticism was influenced by American formalism and archetypal criticism. These schools of literary criticism complemented each other. Her version of formalism gave her a specific vocabulary and a general method to teach students to explicate literature in general. She emphasized close textual reading and required to support their ideas with passages from the text. Also, she used Joseph Campbell's monomyth to structure the narrative of the Odyssey, and she encouraged students to relate themes and symbols to their own lives and to society in general. She stressed that the Odyssey is an archetypal myth that is relevant to every epoch. In short, this study illustrates that curriculum and pedagogy are intertwined; her version of literary criticism is a pedagogy in itself, a pedagogy that is unified with--not separated from--content.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarter, Kathyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGriffin, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9502625en_US
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