PRODUCTION, BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION, AND NUTRITIONAL TRIALS OF BACTERIAL PROTEASE-EXTRACTED BY-PRODUCT PROTEINS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186813
Title:
PRODUCTION, BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION, AND NUTRITIONAL TRIALS OF BACTERIAL PROTEASE-EXTRACTED BY-PRODUCT PROTEINS.
Author:
HUNTER, BRIAN.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A method of solubilizing and extracting proteins from by-products was tested. The raw materials used were finely homogenized and digested at 60(DEGREES)C and pH 10.5 for 30 to 120 minutes in the presence of 0.5% alkaline nonspecific bacterial proteases from Bacillus subtillis. The protein in solution was separated from nonsoluble and organic solvent soluble components by filtration or centrifugation. When desired, the proteinaceous solution was dried (preferably by spray drying). Raw materials that were test digested included keratin from turkey feathers, bovine skin collagen, shark waste, shrimp heads, whole squid, inedible chicken carcass, bovine blood plasma, slaughterhouse waste, cotton gin waste, Enteromorpha sp. (a marine alga), Batis sp. and Distycilus sp. (two halophytes), soybean meal, casein, and fibrinogen. With this method, plant proteins were 57.4% to 59.9% extractable and animal proteins were 75.8% to 93.0% extractable. The native protein hydrolyzed by the procedure was reduced to an average molecular weight of 10,000-15,000 daltons. Other changes characteristic of the digestion process were increased protein concentration and decreased ash concentration. Complementation of by-product proteins in Tetrahymena medium resulted in increased growth compared to Tetrahymena cultures using soy or casein as the sole protein source up to 1.25 times. Decreasing protein molecular weight resulted in decreased growth in Tetrahymena (up to 4 times). Shrimp fed hydrolyzed animal proteins grew only 37.6% to 54.8% as much as squid-fed shrimp controls. White leghorn chicks fed 40% protein as hydrolyzed by-product proteins grew as much as chicks fed a commercial-type milo-soy diet supplemented with methionine. Amino acids from smaller peptides were more rapidly absorbed and more completely incorporated into muscle mass by chicks than were larger peptides.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Animal industry -- By-products.; Proteins -- Separation.; Microbial enzymes.; Waste products as feed.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Agricultural Biochemistry and Nutrition; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePRODUCTION, BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION, AND NUTRITIONAL TRIALS OF BACTERIAL PROTEASE-EXTRACTED BY-PRODUCT PROTEINS.en_US
dc.creatorHUNTER, BRIAN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHUNTER, BRIAN.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA method of solubilizing and extracting proteins from by-products was tested. The raw materials used were finely homogenized and digested at 60(DEGREES)C and pH 10.5 for 30 to 120 minutes in the presence of 0.5% alkaline nonspecific bacterial proteases from Bacillus subtillis. The protein in solution was separated from nonsoluble and organic solvent soluble components by filtration or centrifugation. When desired, the proteinaceous solution was dried (preferably by spray drying). Raw materials that were test digested included keratin from turkey feathers, bovine skin collagen, shark waste, shrimp heads, whole squid, inedible chicken carcass, bovine blood plasma, slaughterhouse waste, cotton gin waste, Enteromorpha sp. (a marine alga), Batis sp. and Distycilus sp. (two halophytes), soybean meal, casein, and fibrinogen. With this method, plant proteins were 57.4% to 59.9% extractable and animal proteins were 75.8% to 93.0% extractable. The native protein hydrolyzed by the procedure was reduced to an average molecular weight of 10,000-15,000 daltons. Other changes characteristic of the digestion process were increased protein concentration and decreased ash concentration. Complementation of by-product proteins in Tetrahymena medium resulted in increased growth compared to Tetrahymena cultures using soy or casein as the sole protein source up to 1.25 times. Decreasing protein molecular weight resulted in decreased growth in Tetrahymena (up to 4 times). Shrimp fed hydrolyzed animal proteins grew only 37.6% to 54.8% as much as squid-fed shrimp controls. White leghorn chicks fed 40% protein as hydrolyzed by-product proteins grew as much as chicks fed a commercial-type milo-soy diet supplemented with methionine. Amino acids from smaller peptides were more rapidly absorbed and more completely incorporated into muscle mass by chicks than were larger peptides.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnimal industry -- By-products.en_US
dc.subjectProteins -- Separation.en_US
dc.subjectMicrobial enzymes.en_US
dc.subjectWaste products as feed.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Biochemistry and Nutritionen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBerry, James W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeber, Charles W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStull, Warren J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217424en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681960612en_US
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