The play of texts in Don DeLillo's "Libra", "Ratner's Star", and "White Noise".

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186812
Title:
The play of texts in Don DeLillo's "Libra", "Ratner's Star", and "White Noise".
Author:
Applen, John David.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The central concern in my dissertation is how current theories of rhetoric and social construction are made manifest in three of Don DeLillo's novels: Libra, White Noise, and Ratner's Star. Libra demonstrates how the historical figure Lee Harvey Oswald and the events surrounding the assassination of John Kennedy are socially constructed by media imagery and the ambient texts of American culture. White Noise is an extension of Libra in that it details how the discourse of American consumer and political culture construct our sense of self and our relationship to others in our society. Ratner's Star can be read as a systems novel that demonstrates how the fictional artifices of mathematics are analogous to the systems of thought based on discourse found in the metalinguistic formations of science in our civilization. I rely heavily on the theories of Michel Foucault to demonstrate this, and supplement Foucault's thinking with the work of philosophers such as M. M. Bakhtin, Thomas Kuhn, Richard Rorty, and composition theorists such as Kurt Spellmeyer. Don DeLillo's novels can also be used in the field of composition as they are excellent exemplars of contemporary discourse theory, and, in an appendix, I provide a sample assignment description and a student's rhetorical analysis of university discourse that is augmented by insights that the student gained from reading White Noise.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Willard, Thomas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe play of texts in Don DeLillo's "Libra", "Ratner's Star", and "White Noise".en_US
dc.creatorApplen, John David.en_US
dc.contributor.authorApplen, John David.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe central concern in my dissertation is how current theories of rhetoric and social construction are made manifest in three of Don DeLillo's novels: Libra, White Noise, and Ratner's Star. Libra demonstrates how the historical figure Lee Harvey Oswald and the events surrounding the assassination of John Kennedy are socially constructed by media imagery and the ambient texts of American culture. White Noise is an extension of Libra in that it details how the discourse of American consumer and political culture construct our sense of self and our relationship to others in our society. Ratner's Star can be read as a systems novel that demonstrates how the fictional artifices of mathematics are analogous to the systems of thought based on discourse found in the metalinguistic formations of science in our civilization. I rely heavily on the theories of Michel Foucault to demonstrate this, and supplement Foucault's thinking with the work of philosophers such as M. M. Bakhtin, Thomas Kuhn, Richard Rorty, and composition theorists such as Kurt Spellmeyer. Don DeLillo's novels can also be used in the field of composition as they are excellent exemplars of contemporary discourse theory, and, in an appendix, I provide a sample assignment description and a student's rhetorical analysis of university discourse that is augmented by insights that the student gained from reading White Noise.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWillard, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoen, Duaneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWarnock, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9502614en_US
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