Social studies education in Arizona: Influences from a decade of reform (1983-1993).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186796
Title:
Social studies education in Arizona: Influences from a decade of reform (1983-1993).
Author:
Klajda, Frank James.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between change in classroom practice of veteran secondary social studies teachers and national/state educational curricular reform movements between 1983 and 1993. A self-report teacher survey was designed to elicit demographic and perceived change in classroom practice information, including gender, courses currently being taught, number of years of continuous teaching in secondary social studies, and level of education. Additionally, the teachers were asked to indicate how they had changed classroom practice and what they attributed the change(s) to. The sample included 244 secondary social studies teachers representing 67 high schools throughout Arizona. Analysis of the data indicated that 97% of the respondents had changed classroom practice over the past decade. In examining the data further, for indication of the perceived type of change, nearly two-thirds of the teachers indicated some manner of pedagogical change. Results also reported that the teachers attributed the change(s) primarily to change in societal or student values and expectations (37%), and personal growth on the part of the teacher (31%). Results indicated that educational reform efforts--both general and specific to social studies--have had little perceived effect on what veteran secondary social studies teachers do in their classrooms. This appears to be particularly true if such reform efforts are not reflected in documents such as state frameworks and district curriculum guides, relevant university coursework, and local staff development efforts.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Robinson, Paul

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSocial studies education in Arizona: Influences from a decade of reform (1983-1993).en_US
dc.creatorKlajda, Frank James.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKlajda, Frank James.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between change in classroom practice of veteran secondary social studies teachers and national/state educational curricular reform movements between 1983 and 1993. A self-report teacher survey was designed to elicit demographic and perceived change in classroom practice information, including gender, courses currently being taught, number of years of continuous teaching in secondary social studies, and level of education. Additionally, the teachers were asked to indicate how they had changed classroom practice and what they attributed the change(s) to. The sample included 244 secondary social studies teachers representing 67 high schools throughout Arizona. Analysis of the data indicated that 97% of the respondents had changed classroom practice over the past decade. In examining the data further, for indication of the perceived type of change, nearly two-thirds of the teachers indicated some manner of pedagogical change. Results also reported that the teachers attributed the change(s) primarily to change in societal or student values and expectations (37%), and personal growth on the part of the teacher (31%). Results indicated that educational reform efforts--both general and specific to social studies--have had little perceived effect on what veteran secondary social studies teachers do in their classrooms. This appears to be particularly true if such reform efforts are not reflected in documents such as state frameworks and district curriculum guides, relevant university coursework, and local staff development efforts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRobinson, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStreitmatter, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPate, Glenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9432862en_US
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