Changes in preservice teacher conceptualizations of the integrated curriculum.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186775
Title:
Changes in preservice teacher conceptualizations of the integrated curriculum.
Author:
Beier, Clara Anne.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore changes in two preservice teachers' conceptualizations of the integrated curriculum. The study followed the participants through an elementary block program at a teachers' college and through student teaching. The sites for the study were divided between the block program and student teaching. The block sites consisted of ten microteaching sessions and a three-week field experience. Student teaching provided the third location. Except for microteaching, each participant was placed in a different site for the block field experience and student teaching. Participants were purposefully place with classroom teachers who practiced integration to an extent, but held views on integration which differed from the college. Methods of data collection included interviews, participant journals, and semantic maps. Each participant was interviewed 13 times during the block and eight times during student teaching. Participant journals and interview transcripts were analyzed using the methods of Spradley (1979, 1980) and the constant-comparative methods of Glaser and Strauss (1967). Findings indicated that although the participants could not recall an integrated curriculum in their own elementary schooling similar to the type being taught in the elementary block program, they were supportive of the curriculum throughout the study. This finding contrasts with those studies which indicate a progressive to conservative trend in or a strong influence of biography on novices' perspectives. Finally, conceptualizations became deeper and more focused through a transactional process. The components of this process included "the self," "personalized metaphors," "communication," and "shaping aspects." Each component transacted with the other in the process of conceptualizing the integrated curriculum. The significance of the study is that the participants maintained support for the integrated curriculum. Although each participant raised questions about integration, they both indicated they would use various configurations in the future. In addition, the study reinforced the importance of helping preservice teachers establish personal forms of communication in the construction of conceptualizations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Doyle, Walter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleChanges in preservice teacher conceptualizations of the integrated curriculum.en_US
dc.creatorBeier, Clara Anne.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeier, Clara Anne.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this qualitative study was to explore changes in two preservice teachers' conceptualizations of the integrated curriculum. The study followed the participants through an elementary block program at a teachers' college and through student teaching. The sites for the study were divided between the block program and student teaching. The block sites consisted of ten microteaching sessions and a three-week field experience. Student teaching provided the third location. Except for microteaching, each participant was placed in a different site for the block field experience and student teaching. Participants were purposefully place with classroom teachers who practiced integration to an extent, but held views on integration which differed from the college. Methods of data collection included interviews, participant journals, and semantic maps. Each participant was interviewed 13 times during the block and eight times during student teaching. Participant journals and interview transcripts were analyzed using the methods of Spradley (1979, 1980) and the constant-comparative methods of Glaser and Strauss (1967). Findings indicated that although the participants could not recall an integrated curriculum in their own elementary schooling similar to the type being taught in the elementary block program, they were supportive of the curriculum throughout the study. This finding contrasts with those studies which indicate a progressive to conservative trend in or a strong influence of biography on novices' perspectives. Finally, conceptualizations became deeper and more focused through a transactional process. The components of this process included "the self," "personalized metaphors," "communication," and "shaping aspects." Each component transacted with the other in the process of conceptualizing the integrated curriculum. The significance of the study is that the participants maintained support for the integrated curriculum. Although each participant raised questions about integration, they both indicated they would use various configurations in the future. In addition, the study reinforced the importance of helping preservice teachers establish personal forms of communication in the construction of conceptualizations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRichardson, Virginiaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClark, Donalden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9432844en_US
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