Fighting sprawl and city hall: Resistance to urban growth in the southwest, 1945-1965.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186742
Title:
Fighting sprawl and city hall: Resistance to urban growth in the southwest, 1945-1965.
Author:
Logan, Michael Farley.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Serious resistance to urban growth in the Southwest arose at the beginning of the post World War II boom and persisted throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Most historians of the urban West ignore this early resistance. Even New Western historians truncate their studies of urbanization in the Southwest by assuming that serious opposition to development only appeared with the rise of environmentalism in the late 1960s. Urbanization in Tucson and Albuquerque proceeded in the face of constant protest. The expressions of opposition to urban expansion arose in conservative and libertarian political critiques and in ethnic resistance to urban renewal plans that targeted barrio areas. A loosely defined environmentalism appeared in these early forms of resistance as residents fought to preserve their lifestyle and native culture.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cities and towns -- Growth.; Opposition (Political science)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
History; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Garcia, Juan R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFighting sprawl and city hall: Resistance to urban growth in the southwest, 1945-1965.en_US
dc.creatorLogan, Michael Farley.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Michael Farley.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSerious resistance to urban growth in the Southwest arose at the beginning of the post World War II boom and persisted throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Most historians of the urban West ignore this early resistance. Even New Western historians truncate their studies of urbanization in the Southwest by assuming that serious opposition to development only appeared with the rise of environmentalism in the late 1960s. Urbanization in Tucson and Albuquerque proceeded in the face of constant protest. The expressions of opposition to urban expansion arose in conservative and libertarian political critiques and in ethnic resistance to urban renewal plans that targeted barrio areas. A loosely defined environmentalism appeared in these early forms of resistance as residents fought to preserve their lifestyle and native culture.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCities and towns -- Growth.en_US
dc.subjectOpposition (Political science)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGarcia, Juan R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMartinez, Oscaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMorrissey, Katherine G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9426570en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703165171en_US
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