Patient compliance and satisfaction with physician influence attempts: A reinforcement expectancy approach to compliance-gaining over time.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186728
Title:
Patient compliance and satisfaction with physician influence attempts: A reinforcement expectancy approach to compliance-gaining over time.
Author:
Klingle, Renee Storm
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Communication expectancy and reinforcement principles are systematically integrated to explain the effectiveness of communication strategies focused on improving initial and long-term medical adherence and patient satisfaction. Study 1 analyzed patients' evaluations of communication regard strategies and the effectiveness of these strategies in initial encounters. It was predicted that physician gender would play a major role in patients' communication evaluations. As predicted, negative regard influence strategies used by male physicians were perceived as more appropriate than negative regard influence strategies used by female physicians. Results did not indicate gender differences in perceptions of expectancies or relational concern as communicated by regard strategies. Study 1 also addressed the effectiveness of influence attempts in initial encounters with a physician. The study supports the predicted interaction for communication effectiveness in initial encounters. Specifically, the results support the claim that female physicians are limited to the use of positive regard strategies whereas male physicians are more effective persuaders using either positive or negative regard strategies. The results also indicate that the use of negative regard strategies by male physicians does not hinder patient satisfaction or physician perceptions, whereas the use of negative regard strategies by female physicians is negatively related to these outcome measures. The reinforcement expectancy framework tested in Study 2 argued that occasional use of nonrewarding communication would facilitate communication effectiveness for both male and female physician in ongoing physician-patient relationships. The results supported this assumption. Physician gender, however, did not mediate the effectiveness of certain strategy combinations as expected. Finally, the investigation found that previous exposure to any type of physician communications style, as opposed to never having seen the physician, facilitated a physician's influence attempts.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Physician and patient.; Public health.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Burgoon, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePatient compliance and satisfaction with physician influence attempts: A reinforcement expectancy approach to compliance-gaining over time.en_US
dc.creatorKlingle, Renee Stormen_US
dc.contributor.authorKlingle, Renee Stormen_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCommunication expectancy and reinforcement principles are systematically integrated to explain the effectiveness of communication strategies focused on improving initial and long-term medical adherence and patient satisfaction. Study 1 analyzed patients' evaluations of communication regard strategies and the effectiveness of these strategies in initial encounters. It was predicted that physician gender would play a major role in patients' communication evaluations. As predicted, negative regard influence strategies used by male physicians were perceived as more appropriate than negative regard influence strategies used by female physicians. Results did not indicate gender differences in perceptions of expectancies or relational concern as communicated by regard strategies. Study 1 also addressed the effectiveness of influence attempts in initial encounters with a physician. The study supports the predicted interaction for communication effectiveness in initial encounters. Specifically, the results support the claim that female physicians are limited to the use of positive regard strategies whereas male physicians are more effective persuaders using either positive or negative regard strategies. The results also indicate that the use of negative regard strategies by male physicians does not hinder patient satisfaction or physician perceptions, whereas the use of negative regard strategies by female physicians is negatively related to these outcome measures. The reinforcement expectancy framework tested in Study 2 argued that occasional use of nonrewarding communication would facilitate communication effectiveness for both male and female physician in ongoing physician-patient relationships. The results supported this assumption. Physician gender, however, did not mediate the effectiveness of certain strategy combinations as expected. Finally, the investigation found that previous exposure to any type of physician communications style, as opposed to never having seen the physician, facilitated a physician's influence attempts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectPhysician and patient.en_US
dc.subjectPublic health.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBurgoon, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgoon, Judeeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBuller, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSabers, Darrellen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9426556en_US
dc.identifier.oclc722853613en_US
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