An analysis of the "our gang" syndrome on a military base community and implications for educational leaders.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186714
Title:
An analysis of the "our gang" syndrome on a military base community and implications for educational leaders.
Author:
McMaster, Karen Jean.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this research was to determine from a sample of 800 military personnel from a Southwestern military base whether there is a significant difference regarding attitudes toward gangs by military personnel living on and off base and whether these attitudes differed based on rank, age, gender, ethnicity, location of residence, or number and age of children. As a result of the data analysis, relevant implications were identified, providing educational and military leaders with information to encourage the establishment of gang-resistant communities. The methodology for this comparative analysis is descriptive/survey in nature. A detailed literature review presented information on theories about gang delinquency, definitions of gangs, gang prevention strategies, and gangs in one Southwestern state. The results of the analysis of data indicated that there are few significant statistical differences in how military personnel living on and off base responded to survey questions. The review of literature suggested that media impact is the overarching influence on community perceptions regardless of whether the community is large or small, structured or unstructured. Recommendations for further research include a replication of this study involving other military bases in the United States, a study which would analyze the perceptions of children of military personnel living on and off base toward gangs, research which would assess the impact of the media on individuals' perceptions of gangs in different communities, procedures to define social disorganization and identify specific factors in communities that would help to categorize a community as organized or disorganized, and a study conducted in a school which would identify on and off base military dependents and non-military dependents to determine whether association with the military affects perceptions and/or gang membership.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Sociology.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Administration and Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Nelson, L. O.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn analysis of the "our gang" syndrome on a military base community and implications for educational leaders.en_US
dc.creatorMcMaster, Karen Jean.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcMaster, Karen Jean.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research was to determine from a sample of 800 military personnel from a Southwestern military base whether there is a significant difference regarding attitudes toward gangs by military personnel living on and off base and whether these attitudes differed based on rank, age, gender, ethnicity, location of residence, or number and age of children. As a result of the data analysis, relevant implications were identified, providing educational and military leaders with information to encourage the establishment of gang-resistant communities. The methodology for this comparative analysis is descriptive/survey in nature. A detailed literature review presented information on theories about gang delinquency, definitions of gangs, gang prevention strategies, and gangs in one Southwestern state. The results of the analysis of data indicated that there are few significant statistical differences in how military personnel living on and off base responded to survey questions. The review of literature suggested that media impact is the overarching influence on community perceptions regardless of whether the community is large or small, structured or unstructured. Recommendations for further research include a replication of this study involving other military bases in the United States, a study which would analyze the perceptions of children of military personnel living on and off base toward gangs, research which would assess the impact of the media on individuals' perceptions of gangs in different communities, procedures to define social disorganization and identify specific factors in communities that would help to categorize a community as organized or disorganized, and a study conducted in a school which would identify on and off base military dependents and non-military dependents to determine whether association with the military affects perceptions and/or gang membership.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectSociology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administration and Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairNelson, L. O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeckman, Paul E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9426543en_US
dc.identifier.oclc722851217en_US
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