Engendering authority in Aemilia Lanyer's "Salve deus rex judaeorum".

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186694
Title:
Engendering authority in Aemilia Lanyer's "Salve deus rex judaeorum".
Author:
McBride, Kari Boyd.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Aemilia Lanyer subverted traditional understandings of poetic subjectivity and altered received generic forms in order to construct herself as poet in a culture that reserved that vocation to men. She did so by creating in her poems a tradition of female poetic subjectivity through the imaginative construction of a community of empowered women. Lanyer fashioned herself a poet within this community and claimed a premier place by virtue of her alliance with the paradoxically humbled yet omnipotent Christ. She announced her poetic vocation through a remaking of the initiatory pastoral poem, transforming the position of women in the orphic genres of lament and epithalamium. In the country house poem, as well, Lanyer altered generic material that served to objectify and silence women in classical precedents and seventeenth-century models. (An appendix discusses Lanyer's use of the Geneva Bible and material from the Book of Common Prayer.)
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ulreich, John C., Jr.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEngendering authority in Aemilia Lanyer's "Salve deus rex judaeorum".en_US
dc.creatorMcBride, Kari Boyd.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcBride, Kari Boyd.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAemilia Lanyer subverted traditional understandings of poetic subjectivity and altered received generic forms in order to construct herself as poet in a culture that reserved that vocation to men. She did so by creating in her poems a tradition of female poetic subjectivity through the imaginative construction of a community of empowered women. Lanyer fashioned herself a poet within this community and claimed a premier place by virtue of her alliance with the paradoxically humbled yet omnipotent Christ. She announced her poetic vocation through a remaking of the initiatory pastoral poem, transforming the position of women in the orphic genres of lament and epithalamium. In the country house poem, as well, Lanyer altered generic material that served to objectify and silence women in classical precedents and seventeenth-century models. (An appendix discusses Lanyer's use of the Geneva Bible and material from the Book of Common Prayer.)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairUlreich, John C., Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, Meg Lotaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Naomien_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchneidau, Herbert N.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9426325en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703168460en_US
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