Discourse of resistance: Reading hysteria in Hardy, James, Dickens, and modern anorexia.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186672
Title:
Discourse of resistance: Reading hysteria in Hardy, James, Dickens, and modern anorexia.
Author:
Mahbobah, Albaraq Abdul.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Discourse of Resistance explores the representation of the mad woman in Nineteenth Century literary texts by such authors as Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, and in modern Freudian psychoanalysis. Generally, in those representations, the figure of the mad woman appears as the outsider to a representational system which fails in representing her: her madness reveals the limits of the logical systems that govern representation; her language shows the failure of the censor; and her body mocks the codes of medicine and hygiene. In Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, Charles Dickens' Little Dorrit, and Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Hysteria appears as a textual space which marks both the representational system's attempt at containing the female subject and her resistance to it. The Anorexia essay extends the scope of the study by analyzing the limits of the psychoanalytic representation of the women who suffer from this disease. In effect, each specific case studied reveals the representational systems' attempt to repression and containment, an attempt which only succeeds to a certain extent.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's studies.; American literature.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Hogle, Jerry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDiscourse of resistance: Reading hysteria in Hardy, James, Dickens, and modern anorexia.en_US
dc.creatorMahbobah, Albaraq Abdul.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMahbobah, Albaraq Abdul.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDiscourse of Resistance explores the representation of the mad woman in Nineteenth Century literary texts by such authors as Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, and in modern Freudian psychoanalysis. Generally, in those representations, the figure of the mad woman appears as the outsider to a representational system which fails in representing her: her madness reveals the limits of the logical systems that govern representation; her language shows the failure of the censor; and her body mocks the codes of medicine and hygiene. In Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, Charles Dickens' Little Dorrit, and Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Hysteria appears as a textual space which marks both the representational system's attempt at containing the female subject and her resistance to it. The Anorexia essay extends the scope of the study by analyzing the limits of the psychoanalytic representation of the women who suffer from this disease. In effect, each specific case studied reveals the representational systems' attempt to repression and containment, an attempt which only succeeds to a certain extent.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's studies.en_US
dc.subjectAmerican literature.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHogle, Jerryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRaval, Sureshen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, Susan M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9426305en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704933517en_US
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