An examination of the development of delinquency in middle childhood.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186669
Title:
An examination of the development of delinquency in middle childhood.
Author:
Scaramella, Laura Virginia.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This investigation was designed to specify the developmental course of adolescent delinquency by examining precursors of delinquency evident in childhood. Two theoretical perspectives were used to examine the influences of childhood behaviors and experiences on the incidence of adolescent delinquency and childhood deviance. Social control theory and social interactional theory were tested on two separate samples. The goal of Study 1 was to determine whether the variables associated with each theory were more predictive of adolescent delinquency rather than concurrent deviance. The sample used in Study 1 was comprised of 206 boys who participated in the Oregon Youth Study. The results of Study 1 indicated that the variables associated with social interactional theory significantly predicted concurrent deviance. After controlling for the influence of fourth and fifth grade deviance, neither theory was predictive of adolescence. Only child deviance significantly predicted police reported delinquency. The goal of Study 2 was to determine whether the variables associated with social control and social interactional theories were predictive of young children's deviance. One hundred and one children were assessed in first, second, fourth, or fifth grade. Results indicated that the variables did not vary in predictability based on the age of the child. Regarding social control theory, children's self control was somewhat associated with deviance after controlling for the influence of children's temperament. Regarding social interactional theory, children who were rated as antisocial were significantly more likely to be rated as deviant. The results of the two studies are discussed in terms of the stability of deviance. That is, in Study 2, children's temperament and antisocial behavior were most strongly associated with concurrent childhood deviance and in Study 1, child deviance was most predictive of delinquency. Thus, deviance may actually be present early in a child's life and may not change with children's development. Instead, society's reactions to deviance may change as children mature such that deviance is more tolerated among children rather than among adolescents.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Juvenile delinquency.; Behavioral assessment of children.; Child development.; Mother and child.; Social control.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Family and Consumer Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gamble, Wendy C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn examination of the development of delinquency in middle childhood.en_US
dc.creatorScaramella, Laura Virginia.en_US
dc.contributor.authorScaramella, Laura Virginia.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis investigation was designed to specify the developmental course of adolescent delinquency by examining precursors of delinquency evident in childhood. Two theoretical perspectives were used to examine the influences of childhood behaviors and experiences on the incidence of adolescent delinquency and childhood deviance. Social control theory and social interactional theory were tested on two separate samples. The goal of Study 1 was to determine whether the variables associated with each theory were more predictive of adolescent delinquency rather than concurrent deviance. The sample used in Study 1 was comprised of 206 boys who participated in the Oregon Youth Study. The results of Study 1 indicated that the variables associated with social interactional theory significantly predicted concurrent deviance. After controlling for the influence of fourth and fifth grade deviance, neither theory was predictive of adolescence. Only child deviance significantly predicted police reported delinquency. The goal of Study 2 was to determine whether the variables associated with social control and social interactional theories were predictive of young children's deviance. One hundred and one children were assessed in first, second, fourth, or fifth grade. Results indicated that the variables did not vary in predictability based on the age of the child. Regarding social control theory, children's self control was somewhat associated with deviance after controlling for the influence of children's temperament. Regarding social interactional theory, children who were rated as antisocial were significantly more likely to be rated as deviant. The results of the two studies are discussed in terms of the stability of deviance. That is, in Study 2, children's temperament and antisocial behavior were most strongly associated with concurrent childhood deviance and in Study 1, child deviance was most predictive of delinquency. Thus, deviance may actually be present early in a child's life and may not change with children's development. Instead, society's reactions to deviance may change as children mature such that deviance is more tolerated among children rather than among adolescents.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectJuvenile delinquency.en_US
dc.subjectBehavioral assessment of children.en_US
dc.subjectChild development.en_US
dc.subjectMother and child.en_US
dc.subjectSocial control.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGamble, Wendy C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGottfredson, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHirschi, Travisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRowe, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTaylor, Angelaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9426302en_US
dc.identifier.oclc705070977en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.