Latin American disengagement from the United States secular trends of increased autonomy, 1948-1983.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186633
Title:
Latin American disengagement from the United States secular trends of increased autonomy, 1948-1983.
Author:
Pinal-Calvillo, Sylvia Adriana.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Two major goals guide this work: first, to empirically describe patterns of secular Latin American behavior in their foreign policy vis a vis the United States; second, to theoretically explain such patterns. Trends of foreign policy behavior in three dimensions: economic, political and diplomatic, were studied for twenty Latin American nations during 36 years. Pooled time-series cross-section statistical analysis was utilized for explanatory purposes. Results suggest empirical evidence to accept that the Latin American political, economic and diplomatic foreign policy behavior towards the US shows a sustained tendency towards disengagement (or increased distancing) for the 1948-83 period. Economic disengagement seems to precede political disengagement. Economic disengagement is recorded in nineteen out of twenty countries in the study, while political disengagement occurs in all twenty. Diplomatic disengagement is recorded in thirteen out of the twenty countries included. Six models, each representing a different theoretical approach, were tested to determine which of them best explains the occurrence of foreign policy disengagement in Latin America: (1) Declining hegemony; (2) Dependency; (3) National Capabilities; (4) World Systems; (5) Integrative model; (6) Interaction effects model. Model 6 proved to have the highest statistical significance. Geographic location and the relative position in the world system are the two sets of variables that best explain foreign policy distancing from the hegemon. Geographic closeness to the US is associated with countries showing greater verbal (political) autonomy in the UN, while engaging in greater levels of convergence in their diplomatic behavior vis a vis the US. Economic disengagement is best explained by the relative position of countries in the World System. Opposite from what is predicted by the theory, as countries move upwardly in the system, they tend to build greater levels of economic convergence with the US as they share common economic interests.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Political science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Volgy, Thomas J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLatin American disengagement from the United States secular trends of increased autonomy, 1948-1983.en_US
dc.creatorPinal-Calvillo, Sylvia Adriana.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPinal-Calvillo, Sylvia Adriana.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo major goals guide this work: first, to empirically describe patterns of secular Latin American behavior in their foreign policy vis a vis the United States; second, to theoretically explain such patterns. Trends of foreign policy behavior in three dimensions: economic, political and diplomatic, were studied for twenty Latin American nations during 36 years. Pooled time-series cross-section statistical analysis was utilized for explanatory purposes. Results suggest empirical evidence to accept that the Latin American political, economic and diplomatic foreign policy behavior towards the US shows a sustained tendency towards disengagement (or increased distancing) for the 1948-83 period. Economic disengagement seems to precede political disengagement. Economic disengagement is recorded in nineteen out of twenty countries in the study, while political disengagement occurs in all twenty. Diplomatic disengagement is recorded in thirteen out of the twenty countries included. Six models, each representing a different theoretical approach, were tested to determine which of them best explains the occurrence of foreign policy disengagement in Latin America: (1) Declining hegemony; (2) Dependency; (3) National Capabilities; (4) World Systems; (5) Integrative model; (6) Interaction effects model. Model 6 proved to have the highest statistical significance. Geographic location and the relative position in the world system are the two sets of variables that best explain foreign policy distancing from the hegemon. Geographic closeness to the US is associated with countries showing greater verbal (political) autonomy in the UN, while engaging in greater levels of convergence in their diplomatic behavior vis a vis the US. Economic disengagement is best explained by the relative position of countries in the World System. Opposite from what is predicted by the theory, as countries move upwardly in the system, they tend to build greater levels of economic convergence with the US as they share common economic interests.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairVolgy, Thomas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSullivan, Michael P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, Edward J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9424966en_US
dc.identifier.oclc722013238en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.