Tectonic evolution and structural control of auriferous veins in the Juneau gold belt, southeastern Alaska.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186623
Title:
Tectonic evolution and structural control of auriferous veins in the Juneau gold belt, southeastern Alaska.
Author:
Miller, Lance Davison.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A portion of northern southeastern Alaska known as the Juneau gold belt is composed of a disparate assemblage of lithotectonic terranes which range in age from Paleozoic and perhaps older to Cretaceous. Five progressive deformational events associated with contractional tectonism began in the mid-Cretaceous time and continued well into the Tertiary. Widespread plutonism occurred in the region from Cretaceous through Tertiary time. Gold-bearing quartz vein systems in the Juneau gold belt formed within a 160-km-long by 5- to 8-km-wide zone along the western margin of the Coast Mountains, Alaska. The vein systems are localized in second and third order shear zones spatially associated with terrane-bounding, mid-Cretaceous thrust faults. Mesoscopic structures integrated with ⁴⁰Ar/ ³⁹Ar ages from vein sericite are interpreted to indicate that a fluid cycling event along the entire belt occurred between 56.5 and >52.8 Ma. Structural analysis of the vein orientations and geometries are interpreted to indicate that mineralization developed under a near-field stress regime of subhorizontal contraction along a west-southwest to east-northeast trending axis. The axis of extension plunged steeply to the southeast. Slight variations in the interpreted stress axes may have been the result of variations in fluid pressure. Post-mineralization deformation was associated with a dextral transpressive regime along the Denali-Chatham Strait fault system. Gold vein mineralization occurred during the latter stages of orogenesis. Fluid flow and subsequent vein development was temporally associated with changes in plate motion during Eocene time. Veining was also synchronous with exhumation and voluminous plutonism immediately inboard of the gold belt. These interacting tectonic events likely facilitated fault-valve action and vein development along now exhumed shear zones.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Gold ores -- Geology -- Alaska -- Juneau Region.; Geology, Structural -- Alaska -- Juneau Region.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geosciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gehrels, George

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTectonic evolution and structural control of auriferous veins in the Juneau gold belt, southeastern Alaska.en_US
dc.creatorMiller, Lance Davison.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Lance Davison.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA portion of northern southeastern Alaska known as the Juneau gold belt is composed of a disparate assemblage of lithotectonic terranes which range in age from Paleozoic and perhaps older to Cretaceous. Five progressive deformational events associated with contractional tectonism began in the mid-Cretaceous time and continued well into the Tertiary. Widespread plutonism occurred in the region from Cretaceous through Tertiary time. Gold-bearing quartz vein systems in the Juneau gold belt formed within a 160-km-long by 5- to 8-km-wide zone along the western margin of the Coast Mountains, Alaska. The vein systems are localized in second and third order shear zones spatially associated with terrane-bounding, mid-Cretaceous thrust faults. Mesoscopic structures integrated with ⁴⁰Ar/ ³⁹Ar ages from vein sericite are interpreted to indicate that a fluid cycling event along the entire belt occurred between 56.5 and >52.8 Ma. Structural analysis of the vein orientations and geometries are interpreted to indicate that mineralization developed under a near-field stress regime of subhorizontal contraction along a west-southwest to east-northeast trending axis. The axis of extension plunged steeply to the southeast. Slight variations in the interpreted stress axes may have been the result of variations in fluid pressure. Post-mineralization deformation was associated with a dextral transpressive regime along the Denali-Chatham Strait fault system. Gold vein mineralization occurred during the latter stages of orogenesis. Fluid flow and subsequent vein development was temporally associated with changes in plate motion during Eocene time. Veining was also synchronous with exhumation and voluminous plutonism immediately inboard of the gold belt. These interacting tectonic events likely facilitated fault-valve action and vein development along now exhumed shear zones.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGold ores -- Geology -- Alaska -- Juneau Region.en_US
dc.subjectGeology, Structural -- Alaska -- Juneau Region.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGehrels, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChase, Clemen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarton, Marken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConey, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoldfarb, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9424957en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704984415en_US
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