Predictors for community acceptance of an alternate/year-round school plan.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186618
Title:
Predictors for community acceptance of an alternate/year-round school plan.
Author:
Schlegel, Marynell Jordan.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The potential advantages of year-round schooling include expanded enrichment, improved remediation, higher achievement, greater community satisfaction, increased pay to teachers and, depending upon the plan, reduced class size. Why then aren't all schools implementing such schedules? What influences the decision? Findings from this case study suggest that decision-making is influenced by the structure of the calendar choice, which includes the culture and climate of the setting, values, and individual circumstances. The data collected in this case study support the following conclusions: (1) People who selected the optional modified calendar (with 176 school days, two intersessions, and a seven-week summer vacation) were more likely to agree that: (a) additional time is needed for education, (b) the change in the calendar may reduce dropout rates and delinquency, (c) review time is reduced by the modified calendar, (d) the modified calendar reduces burnout in students and teachers, (e) seven weeks is sufficient for summer vacation, and (f) the optional/modified calendar is an improvement which allows study inside during the southwest's hot weather and play outside during the more comfortable weather. (2) Marked contrasts existed between values and environmental circumstances for parents who chose traditional and those who chose optional calendar plans. It appeared that optional calendar proponents emphasized value issues. (3) Child custody issues did not surface as a dominant factor in this case study of calendar choice. (4) Child care needs, while considered important, appeared to be a lower order concern, possibly due to the structure of choice presented in this case study (with a free Parks and Recreation Program offered and low-cost day care made available at the school site).
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Education, Elementary.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Grant, Robert T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePredictors for community acceptance of an alternate/year-round school plan.en_US
dc.creatorSchlegel, Marynell Jordan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchlegel, Marynell Jordan.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe potential advantages of year-round schooling include expanded enrichment, improved remediation, higher achievement, greater community satisfaction, increased pay to teachers and, depending upon the plan, reduced class size. Why then aren't all schools implementing such schedules? What influences the decision? Findings from this case study suggest that decision-making is influenced by the structure of the calendar choice, which includes the culture and climate of the setting, values, and individual circumstances. The data collected in this case study support the following conclusions: (1) People who selected the optional modified calendar (with 176 school days, two intersessions, and a seven-week summer vacation) were more likely to agree that: (a) additional time is needed for education, (b) the change in the calendar may reduce dropout rates and delinquency, (c) review time is reduced by the modified calendar, (d) the modified calendar reduces burnout in students and teachers, (e) seven weeks is sufficient for summer vacation, and (f) the optional/modified calendar is an improvement which allows study inside during the southwest's hot weather and play outside during the more comfortable weather. (2) Marked contrasts existed between values and environmental circumstances for parents who chose traditional and those who chose optional calendar plans. It appeared that optional calendar proponents emphasized value issues. (3) Child custody issues did not surface as a dominant factor in this case study of calendar choice. (4) Child care needs, while considered important, appeared to be a lower order concern, possibly due to the structure of choice presented in this case study (with a free Parks and Recreation Program offered and low-cost day care made available at the school site).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementary.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGrant, Robert T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, Lawrence O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeckman, Paul E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9424951en_US
dc.identifier.oclc722007947en_US
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