The effects of early grade retention on academic achievement at subsequent grades.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186614
Title:
The effects of early grade retention on academic achievement at subsequent grades.
Author:
McCorkle-Benz, Lori Kay.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Grade retention continues to be a common educational practice in the United States. Educators have typically used this procedure as a means of addressing academic deficits demonstrated by students. Although numerous research studies have been conducted to examine the efficacy of grade retention, conflicting results are reported at the first grade level. Few studies have addressed the issue of ethnicity and grade retention, although retainees are typically minority students. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of first grade retention on second grade achievement in a predominately Hispanic population. In addition, this study examined the effects of retention based on gender. Seventy-three students who were retained in the first grade served as the subjects in this study. Each subject was matched with two promoted control students based on reading achievement, math achievement, language achievement, ethnicity, sex, birthdate, socioeconomic status and primary language of the home. Academic achievement was compared at the end of the students' second grade years. Results indicated that the reading, language and math scores of the retained subjects and the reading, language and math scores of the nonretained counterparts did not differ significantly. Differences of retention benefits based on ethnicity and gender were not evident. The results were discussed in relation to results obtained from previous research studies. Investigation of alternative strategies to address student academic deficits was indicated.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Education, Elementary.; Educational psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Mishra, Shitala

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe effects of early grade retention on academic achievement at subsequent grades.en_US
dc.creatorMcCorkle-Benz, Lori Kay.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCorkle-Benz, Lori Kay.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGrade retention continues to be a common educational practice in the United States. Educators have typically used this procedure as a means of addressing academic deficits demonstrated by students. Although numerous research studies have been conducted to examine the efficacy of grade retention, conflicting results are reported at the first grade level. Few studies have addressed the issue of ethnicity and grade retention, although retainees are typically minority students. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of first grade retention on second grade achievement in a predominately Hispanic population. In addition, this study examined the effects of retention based on gender. Seventy-three students who were retained in the first grade served as the subjects in this study. Each subject was matched with two promoted control students based on reading achievement, math achievement, language achievement, ethnicity, sex, birthdate, socioeconomic status and primary language of the home. Academic achievement was compared at the end of the students' second grade years. Results indicated that the reading, language and math scores of the retained subjects and the reading, language and math scores of the nonretained counterparts did not differ significantly. Differences of retention benefits based on ethnicity and gender were not evident. The results were discussed in relation to results obtained from previous research studies. Investigation of alternative strategies to address student academic deficits was indicated.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementary.en_US
dc.subjectEducational psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberObrzut, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFranklin, Jr., Melvinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9424947en_US
dc.identifier.oclc722009433en_US
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