The effect of research-based science instruction on the attitudes of students, by gender, towards science, scientists, and careers in science.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186605
Title:
The effect of research-based science instruction on the attitudes of students, by gender, towards science, scientists, and careers in science.
Author:
Lockwood, Jeffrey Frank.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research-based curriculum is a system of instruction which uses an authentic learning, problem-solving, cooperative learning, hands-on, and inquiry-discovery approach, guided by a constructivist philosophy. Its usefulness has been recognized for many decades but "research in the classroom" has not been adopted as a teaching method by many. This study centers on research done by students in science classrooms. The primary purpose of this study was to measure, both quantitatively and qualitatively; (1) students' understanding, by gender, of the nature of science and, (2) student attitude changes, by gender, toward the nature of science, scientists, and careers in science before and after the completion of research projects. The gender equity problem in science classes is explored and improvements in four process skills were measured for both treatment and control groups. Also, different models of research-based science education are described. The Test of Science Related Attitudes (TOSRA) and the Nature of Science Scale (NOSS) were given pre and post to both groups. Several qualitative instruments were given and student journals were analyzed by gender. The results of TOSRA showed gains in positive attitude for students after they experience a research-based curriculum for six of the seven TOSRA scales. However, the control group had similar gains so the mixed design analysis of variance showed no statistically significant differences between control vs. treatment or male vs. female interactions. Much of the qualitative analysis revealed that students' understanding of the nature of science changes considerably after they "do" scientific research. The journal analysis and the "Research is...." question analysis show that students also have a significant affective response to the research experience. Quantitatively, the total NOSS score improvement for the treatment group was substantial (11.4 to 13.8) and better than the control, although it was not a statistically significant difference. Generally, treatment students showed greater improvement on all NOSS scales. Treatment students also had greater gains on the four different process skills measured in this study. Research-based curriculum is an effective way to change students' attitudes towards science and a sound way to increase student understanding about the nature of the research process.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Secondary.; Science -- Study and teaching.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Clark, Donald C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe effect of research-based science instruction on the attitudes of students, by gender, towards science, scientists, and careers in science.en_US
dc.creatorLockwood, Jeffrey Frank.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLockwood, Jeffrey Frank.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch-based curriculum is a system of instruction which uses an authentic learning, problem-solving, cooperative learning, hands-on, and inquiry-discovery approach, guided by a constructivist philosophy. Its usefulness has been recognized for many decades but "research in the classroom" has not been adopted as a teaching method by many. This study centers on research done by students in science classrooms. The primary purpose of this study was to measure, both quantitatively and qualitatively; (1) students' understanding, by gender, of the nature of science and, (2) student attitude changes, by gender, toward the nature of science, scientists, and careers in science before and after the completion of research projects. The gender equity problem in science classes is explored and improvements in four process skills were measured for both treatment and control groups. Also, different models of research-based science education are described. The Test of Science Related Attitudes (TOSRA) and the Nature of Science Scale (NOSS) were given pre and post to both groups. Several qualitative instruments were given and student journals were analyzed by gender. The results of TOSRA showed gains in positive attitude for students after they experience a research-based curriculum for six of the seven TOSRA scales. However, the control group had similar gains so the mixed design analysis of variance showed no statistically significant differences between control vs. treatment or male vs. female interactions. Much of the qualitative analysis revealed that students' understanding of the nature of science changes considerably after they "do" scientific research. The journal analysis and the "Research is...." question analysis show that students also have a significant affective response to the research experience. Quantitatively, the total NOSS score improvement for the treatment group was substantial (11.4 to 13.8) and better than the control, although it was not a statistically significant difference. Generally, treatment students showed greater improvement on all NOSS scales. Treatment students also had greater gains on the four different process skills measured in this study. Research-based curriculum is an effective way to change students' attitudes towards science and a sound way to increase student understanding about the nature of the research process.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization note: p. 67 missing from paper original; p. 139 missing from paper original but content indicated in table of contents appears on p. 138 which may be the missing content.en
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondary.en_US
dc.subjectScience -- Study and teaching.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStreitmatter, Janen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStrom, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCarthy, Donen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9424938en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704420377en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.