EFFECTS OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING ON LOCUS OF CONTROL AND ANXIETY OF DEAF COLLEGE STUDENTS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186591
Title:
EFFECTS OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING ON LOCUS OF CONTROL AND ANXIETY OF DEAF COLLEGE STUDENTS.
Author:
SEWARD, KAY MARLENE.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated the effects of frontalis electromyographic biofeedback training on internality, externality, anxiety, and muscle tension of deaf college students. Student volunteers enrolled at a post-secondary institution providing support services for the deaf were randomly assigned to either an experimental group or a no-treatment control group. The experimental group consisted of 36 subjects (21 males, 15 females) and the control group included 34 subjects (18 males, 16 females). Pretreatment and posttreatment baseline measures of the dependent variables of locus of control, anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG) levels were recorded using the Learning Styles Inventory (National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology, New York), A Test of Attitudes (F. J. Dowaliby, National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology, New York), and the Myosone 409 EMG Monitor/Data Processor (Bio-Logic Devices, Inc., Plainview, New York). The experimental group received six half-hour biofeedback sessions during a 3-week treatment phase. The control group was not seen during the treatment phase. Results of analyses of covariance indicated that frontalis electromyographic biofeedback training had no significant effects on internality (F = .009, p = .923), externality (F = .014, p = .905), and anxiety (F = .536, p = .467). Significant differences (F = 3.851, p = .054) were found between experimental and control groups on electromyographic levels. Findings suggest that frontalis electromyographic biofeedback training can be used to reduce muscle tension in a deaf population. This has implications for the prevention and reduction of stress-related disorders. Further research is needed to determine the effects of a longer biofeedback training period on locus of control and anxiety.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biofeedback training.; Deaf -- Psychology.; Control (Psychology); Anxiety.; Stress (Psychology)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEFFECTS OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING ON LOCUS OF CONTROL AND ANXIETY OF DEAF COLLEGE STUDENTS.en_US
dc.creatorSEWARD, KAY MARLENE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSEWARD, KAY MARLENE.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the effects of frontalis electromyographic biofeedback training on internality, externality, anxiety, and muscle tension of deaf college students. Student volunteers enrolled at a post-secondary institution providing support services for the deaf were randomly assigned to either an experimental group or a no-treatment control group. The experimental group consisted of 36 subjects (21 males, 15 females) and the control group included 34 subjects (18 males, 16 females). Pretreatment and posttreatment baseline measures of the dependent variables of locus of control, anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG) levels were recorded using the Learning Styles Inventory (National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology, New York), A Test of Attitudes (F. J. Dowaliby, National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology, New York), and the Myosone 409 EMG Monitor/Data Processor (Bio-Logic Devices, Inc., Plainview, New York). The experimental group received six half-hour biofeedback sessions during a 3-week treatment phase. The control group was not seen during the treatment phase. Results of analyses of covariance indicated that frontalis electromyographic biofeedback training had no significant effects on internality (F = .009, p = .923), externality (F = .014, p = .905), and anxiety (F = .536, p = .467). Significant differences (F = 3.851, p = .054) were found between experimental and control groups on electromyographic levels. Findings suggest that frontalis electromyographic biofeedback training can be used to reduce muscle tension in a deaf population. This has implications for the prevention and reduction of stress-related disorders. Further research is needed to determine the effects of a longer biofeedback training period on locus of control and anxiety.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiofeedback training.en_US
dc.subjectDeaf -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectControl (Psychology)en_US
dc.subjectAnxiety.en_US
dc.subjectStress (Psychology)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8319732en_US
dc.identifier.oclc689052447en_US
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